HOMILY AGAINST DISOBEDIENCE AND WILFUL REBELLION

from Short-Title Catalogue 13675.
Renaissance Electronic Texts 1.2. © 1994, 1997 Ian Lancashire (ed.)
University of Toronto

UTEL Home Page.


AN HOMILIE AGAINST
disobedience and wilfull
rebellion


The first part.

[II.21.1-1]  AS GOD the Creatour and Lord of all
[II.21.1-2]  things appointed his Angels and hea­
[II.21.1-3]  uenly creatures in all obedience to serue
[II.21.1-4]  and to honour his maiesty: so was it
[II.21.1-5]  his will that man, his chiefe creature
[II.21.1-6]  vpon the earth, should liue vnder the
[II.21.1-7]  obedience of his Creatour and Lord:
[II.21.1-8]  and for that cause, GOD, assoone
[II.21.1-9]  as hee had created man, gaue vnto him
[II.21.1-10]  a certaine precept and law, which hee
[II.21.1-11]  (being yet in the state of innocency, and
[II.21.1-12]  remayning in Paradise) should obserue
[II.21.1-13]  as a pledge and token of his due and
[II.21.1-14]  bounden obedience, with denunciation of death if hee did transgresse
[II.21.1-15]  and breake the sayd Law and commandement. And as GOD would
[II.21.1-16]  haue man to be his obedient subiect, so did he make all earthly creatures
[II.21.1-17]  subiect vnto man, who kept their due obedience vnto man, so long as
[II.21.1-18]  man remayned in his obedience vnto GOD: in the which obedience if
[II.21.1-19]  man had continued still, there had beene no pouerty, no diseases, no sicke­
[II.21.1-20]  nesse, no death, nor other miseries wherewith mankinde is now infinite­
[II.21.1-21]  ly and most miserably afflicted and oppressed. So heere appeareth the
[II.21.1-22]  originall kingdome of GOD ouer Angels and man, and vniuersally
[II.21.1-23]  ouer all things, and of man ouer earthly creatures which GOD had
[II.21.1-24]  made subiect vnto him, and with all the felicity and blessed state, which
[II.21.1-25]  Angels, man, and all creatures had remayned in, had they continued in
[II.21.1-26]  due obedience vnto GOD their King. For as long as in this first king­
[II.21.1-27]  dome the subiects continued in due obedience to GOD their king, so
[II.21.1-28]  long did GOD embrace all his subiects with his loue, fauour, and
[II.21.1-29]  grace, which to enioy, is perfect felicity, whereby it is euident, that obe­
[II.21.1-30]  dience is the principall vertue of all vertues, and indeed the very root of
[II.21.1-31]  all vertues, and the cause of all felicitie. But as all felicitie and blessed­
[II.21.1-32]  nesse should haue continued with the continuance of obedience, so with

[margin]
Mat.4.b. 9.
Matth.25.
d.41.

[margin]

[II.21.1-33]  the breach of obedience, and breaking in of rebellion, al vices and miseries
[II.21.1-34]  did withall breake in, and ouerwhelme the world. The first authour of

[margin]
Ioh.8.f.44.
[margin]

[II.21.1-35]  which rebellion, the root of all vices, and mother of all mischiefes, was

[margin]
2.Pe.2.a.4.
[margin]

[II.21.1-36]  Lucifer, first GODS most excellent creature, and most bounden subiect,

[margin]
Epist.Iud.
a.6.

[margin]

[II.21.1-37]  who by rebelling against the Maiestie of GOD, of the brightest and
[II.21.1-38]  most glorious Angel, is become the blackest and most foulest fiend and de­

[margin]
Apoc.12.
b.7.

[margin]

[II.21.1-39]  uill: and from the height of heauen, is fallen into the pit and bottome
[II.21.1-40]  of hell.

[margin]
Gen.3.a.1.
&c.

[margin]

[II.21.1-41]  Here you may see the first authour and founder of rebellion, and the re­

[margin]
Wisd.2.d.
24.

[margin]

[II.21.1-42]  ward thereof, here you may see the graund captaine and father of rebels,
[II.21.1-43]  who perswading the following of his rebellion against GOD their Cre­

[margin]
Gen.3.b.8.
9.&c.c.17.
& d.23.24.

[margin]

[II.21.1-44]  atour and Lord, vnto our first Parents Adam and Eue, brought them in
[II.21.1-45]  high displeasure with GOD, wrought their exile and banishment out of
[II.21.1-46]  Paradise, a place of all pleasure and goodnesse, into this wretched earth
[II.21.1-47]  and vale of misery: procured vnto them, sorrowes of their mindes, mis­
[II.21.1-48]  chiefes, sickenesse, diseases, death of their bodies, and which is farre more
[II.21.1-49]  horrible then all worldly and bodily mischiefes, he had wrought thereby

[margin]
Rom.5.c.
12.&c.&
d.19 &c.

[margin]

[II.21.1-50]  their eternall and euerlasting death and damnation, had not GOD by
[II.21.1-51]  the obedience of his Sonne Iesus Christ repaired that, which man by dis­
[II.21.1-52]  obedience and rebellion had destroyed, and so of his mercy had pardoned
[II.21.1-53]  and forgiuen him: of which all and singular the premises, the holy Scrip­
[II.21.1-54]  tures doe beare record in sundry places.

[II.21.1-55]  Thus doe you see, that neither heauen nor paradise could suffer any re­
[II.21.1-56]  bellion in them, neither be places for any rebels to remaine in. Thus be­
[II.21.1-57]  came rebellion, as you see, both the first and the greatest, and the very foot
[II.21.1-58]  of all other sinnes, and the first and principall cause, both of all worldly
[II.21.1-59]  and bodily miseries, sorrowes, diseases, sickenesses, and deathes, and
[II.21.1-60]  which is infinitely worse then all these, as is said, the very cause of death
[II.21.1-61]  and damnation eternall also. After this breach of obedience to GOD,
[II.21.1-62]  and rebellion against his Maiestie, all mischiefes and miseries breaking
[II.21.1-63]  in therewith, and ouerflowing the world, lest all things should come vnto

[margin]
Gen.3.d.17
[margin]

[II.21.1-64]  confusion and vtter ruine, GOD foorthwith by lawes giuen vnto man­
[II.21.1-65]  kind, repaired againe the rule and order of obedience thus by rebellion
[II.21.1-66]  ouerthrowne, and besides the obedience due vnto his Maiesty, hee not

[margin]
Gen.3.c.16
[margin]

[II.21.1-67]  onely ordained that in families and housholds, the wife should be obedi­
[II.21.1-68]  ent vnto her husband, the children vnto their parents, the seruants vn­

[margin]
Iob.34.d
30.&36.a
7.

[margin]

[II.21.1-69]  to their masters: but also, when mankind increased, and spread it selfe
[II.21.1-70]  more largely ouer the world, hee by his holy word did constitute and or­
[II.21.1-71]  daine in Cities and Countreys seuerall and speciall gouernours and ru­

[margin]
Eccl.8.a.2.
& 10.c.16.
17.&d.20.

[margin]

[II.21.1-72]  lers, vnto whom the residue of his people should be obedient.

[II.21.1-73]  As in reading of the holy Scriptures, we shall finde in very many and
[II.21.1-74]  almost infinite places, aswell of the olde Testament, as of the new, that

[margin]
Psal 18.g.
50.&20.b.
6.&21.a.1.

[margin]

[II.21.1-75]  Kings and Princes, aswell the euill as the good, doe raigne by Gods or­
[II.21.1-76]  dinance, and that subiects are bounden to obey them: that GOD doth

[margin]
Pro.8.b.15.
[margin]

[II.21.1-77]  giue Princes wisedome, great power, and authority: that GOD de­
[II.21.1-78]  fendeth them against their enemies, and destroyeth their enemies horri­
[II.21.1-79]  bly: that the anger and displeasure of the Prince, is as the roaring of a
[II.21.1-80]  Lyon, and the very messenger of death: and that the subiect that prouo­
[II.21.1-81]  keth him to displeasure, sinneth against his own soule: With many other
[II.21.1-82]  things, concerning both the authority of Princes, and the duetie of sub­
[II.21.1-83]  iects. But heere let vs rehearse two speciall places out of the new Te­
[II.21.1-84]  stament, which may stand in stead of all other. The first out of Saint
[II.21.1-85]  Pauls Epistle to the Romanes and the thirteenth Chapter, where hee
[II.21.1-86]  'writeth thus vnto all subiects, Let euery soule be subiect vnto the high­

[margin]
Rom.13.
[margin]

[II.21.1-87]  'er powers, for there is no power but of GOD, and the powers that be,
[II.21.1-88]  'are ordeined of GOD. Whosoeuer therefore resisteth the power, resi­
[II.21.1-89]  'steth the ordinance of GOD, and they that resist, shall receiue to them­
[II.21.1-90]  'selues damnation. For Princes are not to be feared for good works, but
[II.21.1-91]  'for euill. Wilt thou then be without feare of the power? Doe well, so
[II.21.1-92]  'shalt thou haue praise of the same: For he is the minister of GOD for
[II.21.1-93]  'thy wealth: But if thou doe euill, feare: for he beareth not the sword for
[II.21.1-94]  'nought, for he is the minister of GOD to take vengeance vpon him that
[II.21.1-95]  'doth euil. Wherefore ye must be subiect, not because of wrath onely, but
[II.21.1-96]  'also for conscience sake: for, for this cause ye pay also tribute, for they are
[II.21.1-97]  'GODS ministers, seruing for the same purpose. Giue to euery man
[II.21.1-98]  'therfore his duty: tribute, to whom tribute belongeth: custome, to whom
[II.21.1-99]  'custome is due: feare, to whom feare belongeth: honour, to whom ye owe
[II.21.1-100]  'honour. Thus far are S.Pauls words. The second place is in S.Peters
[II.21.1-101]  'Epistle, and the second Chapter, whose words are these, Submit your

[margin]
1.Pet.2.
[margin]

[II.21.1-102]  'selues vnto all maner of ordinances of man for the Lords sake, whether
[II.21.1-103]  'it bee vnto the King, as vnto the chiefe head, either vnto rulers, as vnto
[II.21.1-104]  'them that are sent of him for the punishment of euil doers, but for the che­
[II.21.1-105]  'rishing of them that doe well. For so is the will of GOD, that with well
[II.21.1-106]  'doing ye may stoppe the mouthes of ignorant & foolish men: as free, and
[II.21.1-107]  'not as hauing the libertie for a cloake of maliciousnesse, but euen as the
[II.21.1-108]  'seruants of GOD. Honour all men, loue brotherly fellowship, feare
[II.21.1-109]  'GOD, honour the King. Seruants, obey your masters with feare,
[II.21.1-110]  not onely if they be good and courteous, but also though they be froward.
[II.21.1-111]  Thus farre out of Saint Peter.

[II.21.1-112]  By these two places of the holy Scriptures, it is most euident that
[II.21.1-113]  Kings, Queenes, and other Princes ( for hee speaketh of authoritie and
[II.21.1-114]  power, be it in men or women) are ordeined of GOD, are to bee obeyed
[II.21.1-115]  and honoured of their subiects: that such subiects, as are disobedient or
[II.21.1-116]  rebellious against their Princes, disobey GOD, and procure their owne
[II.21.1-117]  damnation: that the gouernment of Princes is a great blessing of GOD,
[II.21.1-118]  giuen for the common wealth, specially of the good and godly: For the
[II.21.1-119]  comfort and cherishing of whom GOD giueth and setteth vp princes: and
[II.21.1-120]  on the contrary part, to the feare and for the punishment of the euill and
[II.21.1-121]  wicked. Finally, that if seruants ought to obey their masters, not onely
[II.21.1-122]  being gentle, but such as be froward: as well and much more ought sub­
[II.21.1-123]  iects to be obedient, not only to their good and courteous, but also to their
[II.21.1-124]  sharpe and rigorous Princes. It commeth therefore neither of chance
[II.21.1-125]  and fortune (as they terme it) nor of the ambition of mortal men and wo­
[II.21.1-126]  men climing vp of their owne accord to dominion, that there bee Kings,
[II.21.1-127]  Queenes, Princes, and other gouernours ouer men being their subiects:
[II.21.1-128]  but all Kings, Queenes, and other gouernours are specially appoynted

[margin]
Psal.10.b
16. & 45.a.
6.&c.
& 47.a.z.

[margin]

[II.21.1-129]  by the ordinance of GOD. And as GOD himselfe, being of an infinite
[II.21.1-130]  Maiestie, power, and wisedome, ruleth and gouerneth all things in hea­
[II.21.1-131]  uen and earth, as the vniuersall Monarch and onely King and Empe­
[II.21.1-132]  rour ouer all, as being onely able to take and beare the charge of all: so

[margin]
Eccle.17.c.
[margin]

[II.21.1-133]  hath hee constituted, ordeyned, and set earthly Princes ouer particular
[II.21.1-134]  Kingdomes and Dominions in earth, both for the auoyding of all confu­
[II.21.1-135]  sion, which els would be in the world, if it should be without gouernours,
[II.21.1-136]  and for the great quiet and benefite of earthly men their subiects, and also
[II.21.1-137]  that the Princes themselues, in authoritie, power, wisedome, prouidence,
[II.21.1-138]  and righteousnesse in gouernement of people and countreys committed to
[II.21.1-139]  their charge, should resemble his heauenly gouernance, as the maiestie
[II.21.1-140]  of heauenly things may by the basenesse of earthly things bee shadowed

[margin]
Matth.18.c
23.&22.12

Psal.10.b.
16.& 45.a.
b.& 47.a.
2.& c.

[margin]

[II.21.1-141]  and resembled. And for that similitude, that is betweene the heauenly
[II.21.1-142]  Monarchie, and earthly Kingdomes well gouerned, our Sauiour
[II.21.1-143]  Christ in sundry parables saith, that the Kingdom of heauen is resembled
[II.21.1-144]  vnto a man, a king: and as the name of the king, is very often attributed
[II.21.1-145]  and giuen vnto GOD in the holy Scriptures, so doeth GOD him­
[II.21.1-146]  selfe in the same Scriptures sometime vouchsafe to communicate his

[margin]
Matt.22.b.
13.&25.c.
34.

[margin]

[II.21.1-147]  Name with earthly Princes, terming them gods: doubtlesse for that
[II.21.1-148]  similitude of gouernement which they haue or should haue, not vnlike

[margin]
Psal.82.b.6
[margin]

[II.21.1-149]  vnto GOD their King. Vnto the which similitude of heauenly go­
[II.21.1-150]  uernement, the neerer and neerer that an earthly Prince doth come in his
[II.21.1-151]  regiment, the greater blessing of GODS mercy is he vnto that coun­
[II.21.1-152]  trey and people ouer whom he reigneth: and the further and further that
[II.21.1-153]  an earthly prince doth swarue from the example of the heauenly gouern­
[II.21.1-154]  ment, the greater plague is he of GODS wrath, and punishment by
[II.21.1-155]  GODS iustice, vnto that countrey and people, ouer whom GOD for
[II.21.1-156]  their sinnes hath places such a Prince and gouernour. For it is indeede
[II.21.1-157]  euident, both by the Scriptures, and dayly by experience, that the main­
[II.21.1-158]  tenance of all vertue and godlinesse, and consequently of the wealth and
[II.21.1-159]  prosperity of a kingdome and people, doeth stand & rest more in a wise and
[II.21.1-160]  good Prince on the one part, then in great multitudes of other men being
[II.21.1-161]  subiects: and on the contrary part, the ouerthrow of all vertue and god­
[II.21.1-162]  linesse, and consequently the decay and vtter ruine of a Realme and people
[II.21.1-163]  doth grow and come more by an vndiscreete and euill gouernour, then by
[II.21.1-164]  many thousands of other men being subiects. Thus say the holy Scrip­

[margin]
Eccles.10.
d.16.

[margin]

[II.21.1-165]  tures, Well is thee, O thou land (saith the Preacher) whose King is
[II.21.1-166]  come of Nobles, and whose princes eate in due season, for necessity, and not

[margin]
Prou.16.
& 29.

[margin]

[II.21.1-167]  for lust. Againe, a wise and righteous King maketh his Realme and peo­
[II.21.1-168]  ple wealthy: and a good, mercifull, and gracious Prince, is as a shadow

[margin]
Eccles.10.
[margin]

[II.21.1-169]  in heate, as a defence in stormes, as deaw, as sweete showres, as fresh wa­

[margin]
Esai. 32.a
[margin]

[II.21.1-170]  ter springs in great droughts.

[II.21.1-171]  Againe the Scriptures, of vndiscreet and euill Princes, speake thus,
[II.21.1-172]  Woe be to thee (O thou land) whose King is but a child, and whose Prin­

[margin]
Eccl.10.16
[margin]

[II.21.1-173]  ces are early at their bankets. Againe, when the wicked doe raigne, then

[margin]
Prou.28.&
29.

[margin]

[II.21.1-174]  men goe to ruine. And againe, A foolish Prince destroyeth the people,
[II.21.1-175]  and a couetous King vndoeth his Subiects. Thus speake the Scrip­
[II.21.1-176]  tures, thus experience testifieth of good and euill Princes.

[II.21.1-177]  What shall Subiects doe then? shall they obey valiant, stout, wise, and
[II.21.1-178]  good Princes, and contemne, disobey, and rebell against children being
[II.21.1-179]  their Princes, or against vndiscreet and euill gouernours? God forbid:
[II.21.1-180]  For first what a perilous thing were it to commit vnto the Subiects the
[II.21.1-181]  iudgement which Prince is wise and godly, and his gouernement good,
[II.21.1-182]  and which is otherwise: as though the foot must iudge of the head: an
[II.21.1-183]  enterprise very heinous, and must needs breed rebellion. For who else
[II.21.1-184]  be they that are most inclined to rebellion, but such haughtie spirits?
[II.21.1-185]  From whom springeth such foule ruine of Realmes? Is not rebellion
[II.21.1-186]  the greatest of all mischiefes? And who are most ready to the greatest
[II.21.1-187]  mischiefes, but the worst men? Rebels therefore the worst of all Sub­
[II.21.1-188]  iects are most ready to rebellion, as being the worst of all vices, and far­
[II.21.1-189]  thest from the duetie of a good Subiect: as on the contrary part the best
[II.21.1-190]  Subiects are most firme and constant in obedience, as in the speciall and
[II.21.1-191]  peculiar vertue of good Subiects. What an vnworthy matter were it
[II.21.1-192]  then to make the naughtiest Subiects, and most inclined to rebellion
[II.21.1-193]  and all euill, iudges ouer their Princes, ouer their gouernment, and ouer
[II.21.1-194]  their counsellers, to determine which of them be good or tolerable, and
[II.21.1-195]  which be euill, and so intolerable, that they must needs be remooued by
[II.21.1-196]  rebels, being euer ready as the naughtiest subiects, soonest to rebell a­
[II.21.1-197]  gainst the best Princes, specially if they be yong in age, women in sexe, or
[II.21.1-198]  gentle and curteous in gouernment, as trusting by their wicked bold­
[II.21.1-199]  nesse, easily to ouerthrow their weakenesse and gentlenesse, or at the least
[II.21.1-200]  so to feare the mindes of such Princes, that they may haue impunitie of
[II.21.1-201]  their mischieuous doings.

[II.21.1-202]  But whereas indeede a rebell is worse then the worst prince, and re­
[II.21.1-203]  bellion worse then the worst gouernement of the worst prince that hi­
[II.21.1-204]  therto hath beene: both rebels are vnmeete ministers, and rebellion an
[II.21.1-205]  vnfit and vnwholsome medicine to reforme any small lackes in a prince,
[II.21.1-206]  or to cure any little griefes in gouernment, such lewd remedies being far
[II.21.1-207]  worse then any other maladies and disorders that can bee in the body of
[II.21.1-208]  a common wealth. But whatsoeuer the prince bee, or his gouerne­
[II.21.1-209]  ment, it is euident that for the most part, those princes whom some sub­
[II.21.1-210]  iectes doe thinke to bee very godly, and vnder whose gouernement they
[II.21.1-211]  reioyce to liue: some other subiects doe take the same to bee euill and vn­
[II.21.1-212]  godly, and doe wish for a change. If therefore all subiects that mislike
[II.21.1-213]  of their prince, should rebell, no Realme should euer bee without rebel­
[II.21.1-214]  lion. It were more meete that rebels should heare the aduise of wise
[II.21.1-215]  men, and giue place vnto their iudgement, and follow the example
[II.21.1-216]  of obedient subiectes, as reason is that they whose vnderstanding is
[II.21.1-217]  blinded with so euill an affection, should giue place to them that bee
[II.21.1-218]  of sound iudgement, and that the worst should giue place to the better:
[II.21.1-219]  and so might Realmes continue in long obedience, peace, and quietnesse.
[II.21.1-220]  But what if the Prince be vndiscreete, and euill indeed, and is also eui­
[II.21.1-221]  dent to all mens eyes, that hee so is? I aske againe, what if it be long of
[II.21.1-222]  the wickednesse of the Subiects, that the Prince is vndiscreete and
[II.21.1-223]  euill? Shall the Subiects both by their wickednesse prouoke GOD
[II.21.1-224]  for their deserued punishment, to giue them an vndiscreet or euill Prince,
[II.21.1-225]  and also rebell against him, and withall against GOD, who for the pu­
[II.21.1-226]  nishment of their sinnes did giue them such a Prince? Will you heare the

[margin]
Iob.34.10.
[margin]

[II.21.1-227]  Scriptures concerning this point? GOD (say the holy Scriptures)
[II.21.1-228]  maketh a wicked man to raigne for the sinnes of the people. Againe,

[margin]
Osee. 13. 6.
[margin]

[II.21.1-229]  GOD giueth a Prince in his anger, meaning an euill one, and taketh
[II.21.1-230]  away a Prince in his displeasure, meaning specially when hee taketh
[II.21.1-231]  away a good Prince for the sinnes of the people: as in our memorie hee
[II.21.1-232]  tooke away our good Iosias king Edward in his yong and good yeeres for

[margin]
2.Par.2.9.
[margin]

[II.21.1-233]  our wickednesse. And contrarily the Scriptures doe teach, that GOD

[margin]
Prou.16.
[margin]

[II.21.1-234]  giueth wisedome vnto Princes, and maketh a wise and good King to
[II.21.1-235]  raigne ouer that people whom he loueth, and who loueth him. Againe,
[II.21.1-236]  if the people obey GOD, both they and their king shal prosper and be safe,

[margin]
1.Reg.12.
[margin]

[II.21.1-237]  els both shall perish, saith GOD by the mouth of Samuel.

[II.21.1-238]  Here you see, that GOD placeth as well euill Princes as good, and
[II.21.1-239]  for what cause he doth both. If wee therefore will haue a good Prince,
[II.21.1-240]  either to be giuen vs, or to continue: now we haue such a one, let vs by
[II.21.1-241]  our obedience to GOD and to our Prince moue GOD thereunto. If we
[II.21.1-242]  will haue an euill Prince (when GOD shall send such a one) taken away,
[II.21.1-243]  and a good in his place, let vs take away our wickednesse which prouo­
[II.21.1-244]  keth GOD to place such a one ouer vs, and GOD will either displace
[II.21.1-245]  him, or of an euill Prince make him a good Prince, so that wee first will
[II.21.1-246]  change our euill into good. For will you heare the Scriptures? The

[margin]
Pro. 21.
[margin]

[II.21.1-247]  heart of the Prince is in GODS hand, which way soeuer it shall please
[II.21.1-248]  him, he turneth it. Thus say the Scriptures. Wherefore let vs turne
[II.21.1-249]  from our sinnes vnto the Lord with all our hearts, and he will turne the
[II.21.1-250]  heart of the Prince, vnto our quiet and wealth? Els for Subiects to de­
[II.21.1-251]  serue through their sinnes to haue an euill Prince, and then to rebell a­
[II.21.1-252]  gainst him, were double and treble euill, by prouoking GOD more to
[II.21.1-253]  plague them. Nay let vs either deserue to haue a good Prince, or let vs
[II.21.1-254]  patiently suffer and obey such as wee deserue. And whether the Prince
[II.21.1-255]  be good or euill, let vs according to the counsell of the holy Scriptures,
[II.21.1-256]  pray for the Prince, for his continuance and increase in goodnesse, if he be
[II.21.1-257]  good, and for his amendment if he be euill.

[II.21.1-258]  Well you heare the Scriptures concerning this most necessary point?
[II.21.1-259]  I exhort therefore (saith S. Paul) that aboue all things, Prayers, Sup­

[margin]
1.Tim.2.
[margin]

[II.21.1-260]  plications, Intercessions, and giuing of thankes bee had for all men, for
[II.21.1-261]  Kings, and all that are in authority, that wee may liue a quiet and peace­
[II.21.1-262]  able life with all godlines: for that is good and acceptable in the sight of
[II.21.1-263]  GOD our Sauiour, &c. This is S. Pauls counsell. And who I pray you,
[II.21.1-264]  was Prince ouer the most part of the Christians, when GODS holy spi­
[II.21.1-265]  rit by Saint Pauls pen gaue them this lesson? Forsooth, Caligula,Clau­
[II.21.1-266]  dius
or Nero: who were not onely no Christians, but Pagans, and also
[II.21.1-267]  either foolish rulers, or most cruell tyrants. Will you yet heare the word
[II.21.1-268]  of GOD to the Iewes, when they were prisoners vnder Nabuchodono­
[II.21.1-269]  sor
King of Babylon, after he had slaine their king, nobles, parents,
[II.21.1-270]  children, and kinsefolkes, burned their countrey, cities, yea Hierusa­
[II.21.1-271]  lem it selfe, and the holy Temple, and had caried the residue remaining
[II.21.1-272]  aliue captiues with him vnto Babylon? Will you heare yet what the Pro­

[margin]
Bar.1.11.
[margin]

[II.21.1-273]  phet Baruch sayth vnto GODS people being in this captiuity? Pray
[II.21.1-274]  you, saith the Prophet, for the life of Nabuchodonosor king of Babylon,
[II.21.1-275]  and for the life of Balthasar his sonne, that their dayes may bee as the
[II.21.1-276]  dayes of heauen vpon the earth, that GOD also may giue vs strength,
[II.21.1-277]  and lighten our eyes, that wee may liue vnder the defence of Nabuchodo­
[II.21.1-278]  nosor
king of Babylon, and vnder the protection of Balthasar his sonne,
[II.21.1-279]  that we may long doe them seruice, and finde fauour in their sight. Pray
[II.21.1-280]  for vs also vnto the Lord our GOD, for we haue sinned against the Lord
[II.21.1-281]  our GOD.

[II.21.1-282]  Thus farre the Prophet Baruch his wordes: which are spoken by him
[II.21.1-283]  vnto the people of GOD, of that king who was an Heathen, a tyrant,
[II.21.1-284]  and cruell oppressour of them, and had beene a murtherer of many thou­
[II.21.1-285]  sands of their nation, and a destroyer of their countrey, with a confes­
[II.21.1-286]  sion that their sinnes had deserued such a prince to raigne ouer them. And
[II.21.1-287]  shall the old Christians, by Saint Pauls exhortation, pray for Caligula,
[II.21.1-288]  Claudius, or Nero? Shall the Iewes pray for Nabuchodonosor? these
[II.21.1-289]  Emperours and Kings being strangers vnto them, being pagans and
[II.21.1-290]  infidels being murtherers, tyrantes, and cruell oppressours of them,
[II.21.1-291]  and destroyers of their countrey, countreymen, and kinsemen, the bur­
[II.21.1-292]  ners of their villages, townes, cities, and temples? And shall not
[II.21.1-293]  wee pray for the long, prosperous, and godly raigne of our naturall
[II.21.1-294]  Prince? No stranger (which is obserued as a great blessing in the Scrip­
[II.21.1-295]  tures) of our Christian, our most gratious Soueraigne, no Heathen,
[II.21.1-296]  nor Pagan Prince? Shall wee not pray for the health of our most mer­
[II.21.1-297]  cifull, most louing Soueraigne, the preseruer of vs and our countrey,
[II.21.1-298]  in so long peace, quietnesse, and securitie, no cruell person, no tyrant,
[II.21.1-299]  no spoyler of our goods, no shedder of bloodes, no burner and destroy­
[II.21.1-300]  er of our townes, cities, and countreys, as were those, for whom
[II.21.1-301]  yet as yee haue heard, Christians being their subiectes ought to pray?
[II.21.1-302]  Let vs not commit so great ingratitude against GOD and our Soue­
[II.21.1-303]  raigne, as not continually to thanke GOD for his gouernement, and
[II.21.1-304]  for his great and continuall benefites and blessings powred vpon vs by
[II.21.1-305]  such gouernement. Let vs not commit so great a sinne against GOD,
[II.21.1-306]  against our selues, and our countrey, as not to pray continually vnto
[II.21.1-307]  GOD for the long continuance of so gratious a Ruler vnto vs, and
[II.21.1-308]  our countrey. Else shall we be vnworthy any longer to enioy those bene­
[II.21.1-309]  fites and blessings of GOD, which hitherto wee haue had by her shalbe
[II.21.1-310]  most worthy to fall into all those mischiefes & miseries, which wee & our
[II.21.1-311]  countrey haue by GODS grace through her gouernment hitherto escaped.

[II.21.1-312]  What shall wee say of those Subiects? may wee call them by the
[II.21.1-313]  name of Subiects? Who neither bee thankefull, nor make any prayer
[II.21.1-314]  to GOD for so gracious a Soueraigne: but also themselues take ar­
[II.21.1-315]  mour wickedly, assemble companies and bands of rebels, to breake
[II.21.1-316]  the publique peace so long continued, and to make, not warre, but
[II.21.1-317]  rebellion, to endanger the person of such a gracious Soueraigne, to
[II.21.1-318]  hazard the estate of their countrey, (for whose defence they should bee
[II.21.1-319]  ready to spend their liues) and being Englishmen, to robbe, spoyle, de­
[II.21.1-320]  stroy and burne in England Englishmen, to kill and murther their owne
[II.21.1-321]  neighbours and kinsefolke, their owne countreymen, to doe all euill
[II.21.1-322]  and mischiefe, yea and more to, then forreigne enemies would, or could
[II.21.1-323]  doe? What shall wee say of these men, who vse themselues thus rebelli­
[II.21.1-324]  ously against their gracious Soueraigne? Who if GOD for their wic­
[II.21.1-325]  kednesse had giuen them an Heathen tyrant to reigne ouer them, were by
[II.21.1-326]  GODS word bound to obey him, and to pray for him? What may
[II.21.1-327]  bee spoken of them? so farre doeth their vnkindenesse, vnnaturalnesse,
[II.21.1-328]  wickednesse, mischieuousnesse in their doings, passe and excell any thing,
[II.21.1-329]  and all things that can bee expressed and vttered by wordes. Onely let
[II.21.1-330]  vs wish vnto all such most speedie repentance, and with so grieuous
[II.21.1-331]  sorrow of heart, as such so horrible sinnes against the Maiestie of GOD
[II.21.1-332]  doe require, who in most extreme vnthankefulnesse doe rise, not onely a­
[II.21.1-333]  gainst their gracious Prince, against their naturall countrey, but a­
[II.21.1-334]  gainst all their countreymen, women, and children, against themselues,
[II.21.1-335]  their wiues, children & kinsefolkes, and by so wicked an example against
[II.21.1-336]  all Christendome, and against whole mankinde of all maner of people
[II.21.1-337]  throughout the wide world, such repentance, I say, such sorrow of heart
[II.21.1-338]  GOD graunt vnto all such, whosoeuer rise of priuate and malicious
[II.21.1-339]  purpose, as is meete for such mischiefes attempted, and wrought by
[II.21.1-340]  them. And vnto vs and all other Subiectes, GOD of his mercie
[II.21.1-341]  graunt, that wee may bee most vnlike to all such, and most like to good,
[II.21.1-342]  naturall, louing, and obedient Subiects: nay, that wee may be such in­
[II.21.1-343]  deede, not onely shewing all obedience our selues, but as many of vs as
[II.21.1-344]  bee able, to the vttermost of our power, abilitie and vnderstanding, to
[II.21.1-345]  stay and represse all rebels, and rebellions against GOD, our gra­
[II.21.1-346]  cious Prince, and naturall countrey, at euery occasion that is offered
[II.21.1-347]  vnto vs. And that which wee all are able to doe, vnlesse wee doe it, wee
[II.21.1-348]  shall bee most wicked, and most worthy to feele in the ende such extreme
[II.21.1-349]  plagues, as GOD hath euer powred vpon rebels.

[II.21.1-350]  Let vs make continuall prayers vnto Almighty GOD, euen from
[II.21.1-351]  the bottome of our hearts, that hee will giue his grace, power and
[II.21.1-352]  strength vnto our gracious Queene Elizabeth, to vanquish and subdue
[II.21.1-353]  all, aswell rebels at home, as forreigne enemies, that all domesticall re­
[II.21.1-354]  bellions being suppressed and pacified, and all outward inuasions re­
[II.21.1-355]  pulsed and abandoned, wee may not onely be sure, and long continue in
[II.21.1-356]  all obedience vnto our gracious Soueraigne, and in that peaceable and
[II.21.1-357]  quiet life which hitherto wee haue ledde vnder her Maiestie, with all
[II.21.1-358]  securitie: but also that both our gracious Queene Elizabeth, and we
[II.21.1-359]  her subiects, may altogether in all obedience vnto GOD the King of
[II.21.1-360]  Kings, and vnto his holy Lawes, leade our liues so in this world, in
[II.21.1-361]  all vertue and godlinesse, that in the world to come, wee may enioy his
[II.21.1-362]  euerlasting kingdome: which I beseech GOD to grant, aswell to our
[II.21.1-363]  gracious Soueraigne, as vnto vs all, for his Sonne our Sauiour Iesus
[II.21.1-364]  Christes sake, to whom with the Father and the holy Ghost, one
[II.21.1-365]  GOD and King immortall bee all glory, prayse, and thankesgiuing
[II.21.1-366]  world without end, Amen.

[II.21.1-367]  Thus haue you heard the first part of this Homilie, now
[II.21.1-368]  good people let vs pray.



{P} The Prayer as in that time it
was published.

O Most mighty GOD, the Lord of hostes, the Gouer­
nour of all creatures, the only giuer of all victories,
Who alone art able to strengthen the weake against
the mighty, and to vanquish infinite multitudes of
thine enemies with the countenance of a few of thy seruants
calling vpon thy Name, and trusting in thee: Defend O
Lord, thy seruant & our Gouernour vnder thee, our Queene
Elizabeth and all thy people committed to her charge, O Lord
withstand the crueltie of all those which be common enemies
as well to the trueth of thy eternall Word, as to their owne
naturall Prince and countrey, and manifestly to this Crowne
and Realme of England, which thou hast of thy diuine pro­
uidence assigned in these our dayes to the gouernment of thy
seruant, our Soueraigne & gracious Queene. O most mer­
cifull Father, (if it be thy holy will) make soft and tender the
stonie hearts of all those that exalt themselues against thy
Trueth, and seeke either to trouble the quiet of this Realme
of England, or to oppresse the Crowne of the same, and con­
uert them to the knowledge of thy Sonne the onely Saui­
our of the world, Iesus Christ that we and they may ioyntly
glorifie thy mercies. Lighten we beseech thee their ignorant
hearts, to imbrace the truth of thy Word, or els so abate their
cruelty (O most mighty Lord) that this our Christian Realm,
with others that confesse thy holy Gospel, may obtaine by
thine aide and strength, suretie from all enemies, without
shedding of Christian blood, whereby all they which bee op­
pressed with their tyrannie, may be relieued, and they which
bee in feare of their crueltie may bee comforted: and finally
that all Christian Realmes, and specially this Realme
of England, may by thy defence and protection continue in
the trueth of the Gospel, and enioy perfect peace, quietnesse,
and securitie: and that we for these thy mercies, ioyntly alto­
gether with one consonant heart and voice, may thankefully
render to thee all laud and praise, that we knit in one god­
ly concord and vnitie amongst our selues, may continu­
ally magnifie thy glorious Name, who with thy son
our Sauiour Iesus Christ, and the holy Ghost,
art one Eternall, Almightie, and most
mercifull GOD: To whom be
all laud, and praise world
without end,
Amen.



{P} The second part of the Homily against
disobedience and wilfull rebellion.

[II.21.2-369]  AS in the first part of this treatie of obedience of subiects
[II.21.2-370]  to their princes, and against disobedience and rebellion,
[II.21.2-371]  I haue alledged diuers sentences out of the holy Scrip­
[II.21.2-372]  tures for proofe: so shall it be good for the better declarati­
[II.21.2-373]  on and confirmation of the sayd wholesome doctrine, to
[II.21.2-374]  alledge one example or two out of the holy Scriptures
[II.21.2-375]  of the obedience of subiects, not only vnto their good and
[II.21.2-376]  gracious gouernours, but also vnto their euill and vnkinde princes. As
[II.21.2-377]  king Saul was not of the best, but rather of the worst sort of Princes, as
[II.21.2-378]  being out of GODS fauour for his disobedience against GOD in
[II.21.2-379]  sparing (in a wrong pity) the king Agag, whom Almighty GOD com­
[II.21.2-380]  manded to be slaine, according to the iustice of GOD against his sworn
[II.21.2-381]  enemy: and although Saul of a deuotion meant to sacrifice such things
[II.21.2-382]  as he spared of the Amalechites to the honour and seruice of GOD: yet
[II.21.2-383]  Saul was reprooued for his wrong mercy and deuotion, and was told that
[II.21.2-384]  obedience would haue more pleased him then such lenity, which sinfull
[II.21.2-385]  humanity (sayth holy Chrysostome) is more cruell before GOD, then
[II.21.2-386]  any murther or shedding of blood when it is commanded of GOD. But
[II.21.2-387]  yet how euill soeuer Saul the King was, and out of GODS fauour,
[II.21.2-388]  yet was he obeyed of his subiect Dauid, the very best of all subiects, and
[II.21.2-389]  most valiant in the seruice of his Prince and Country in the warres, the
[II.21.2-390]  most obedient and louing in peace, and alwayes most true and faythfull
[II.21.2-391]  to his Soueraigne and Lord, and furthest off from all manner of rebel­
[II.21.2-392]  lion. For the which his most painefull, true, and faythfull seruice, King
[II.21.2-393]  Saul yet rewarded him not onely with great vnkindnesse, but also sought
[II.21.2-394]  his destruction and death by all meanes possible: so that Dauid was faine
[II.21.2-395]  to saue his life, not by rebellion, or any resistance, but by flight and hi­
[II.21.2-396]  ding himselfe from the Kings sight. Which notwithstanding, when king
[II.21.2-397]  Saul vpon a time came alone into the caue where Dauid was, so that Da­
[II.21.2-398]  uid
might easily haue slaine him, yet would he neither hurt him himselfe,
[II.21.2-399]  neither suffer any of his men to lay hands vpon him. Another time also
[II.21.2-400]  Dauid entring by night with one Abisai a valiant and fierce man, into the
[II.21.2-401]  tent where King Saul did lie a sleepe, where also he might yet more easily
[II.21.2-402]  haue slaine him, yet would he neither hurt him himselfe, nor suffer Abisai
[II.21.2-403]  
(who was willing and ready to slay King Saul) once to touch him. Thus
[II.21.2-404]  did Dauid deale with Saul his Prince, notwithstanding that King Saul
[II.21.2-405]  continually sought his death and destruction. It shall not be amisse vn­
[II.21.2-406]  to these deedes of Dauid to adde his words, and to shew you what he spake
[II.21.2-407]  vnto such as encouraged him to take his opportunity and aduantage to

[margin]
1.Reg.24.b
7.&c.

[margin]

[II.21.2-408]  slay King Saul, as his mortall enemie, when hee might. The Lord keepe
[II.21.2-409]  me, saith Dauid, from doing that thing, and from laying hands vpon my

[margin]
1.Reg.26.b
9.&b.10.
&c.

[margin]

[II.21.2-410]  lord, GODS anoynted. For who can lay his hand vpon the Lords
[II.21.2-411]  anoynted, and be guiltlesse? As truely as the Lord liueth, except that the
[II.21.2-412]  Lord doe smite him, or his dayes shall come to die, or that hee goe downe
[II.21.2-413]  to warre, and be slaine in battell: the Lord be mercifull vnto me, that I
[II.21.2-414]  lay not my hand vpon the Lords anoynted.

[II.21.2-415]  These bee Dauids words spoken at sundry times to diuers his seruants
[II.21.2-416]  prouoking him to slay king Saul, when opportunitie serued him there­

[margin]
1.Reg 24.a
[margin]

[II.21.2-417]  unto. Neyther is it to bee omitted and left out, how when an Ama­
[II.21.2-418]  lechite had slaine king Saul, euen at Sauls owne bidding, and commande­

[margin]
1.Reg.1.b.
7.&b.9

[margin]

[II.21.2-419]  ment (for hee would liue no longer now, for that hee had lost the field a­

[margin]
2.Reg.1.b.
[margin]

[II.21.2-420]  gainst his enemies the Philistims) the said Amalechite making great
[II.21.2-421]  haste to bring first word & newes thereof vnto Dauid, as ioyous vnto him
[II.21.2-422]  for the death of his mortall enemie, bringing withall the crowne that
[II.21.2-423]  was vpon king Sauls head, and the bracelet that was about his arme,
[II.21.2-424]  both as a proofe of the trueth of his newes, and also as fit and pleasant pre­
[II.21.2-425]  sents vnto Dauid, being by GOD appoynted to be King, Saul his succes­
[II.21.2-426]  sour in the kingdome: Yet was that faithfull and godly Dauid so farre

[margin]
2.Reg.1.c
12.

[margin]

[II.21.2-427]  from reioycing at these newes, that he rent his clothes, wept, and mour­
[II.21.2-428]  ned, and fasted: and so farre off from thankesgiuing to the messenger, ey­
[II.21.2-429]  ther for his deede in killing the king, though his deadly enemie, or for his
[II.21.2-430]  message and newes, or for his presents that he brought, that he said vnto
[II.21.2-431]  'him, How happened it that thou wast not afraid to lay thy hands

[margin]
2.Reg.1.c.
4.c.15.

[margin]

[II.21.2-432]  'vpon the Lords anoynted, to slay him? Whereupon, immediatly he com­
[II.21.2-433]  'manded one of his seruants to kill the messenger, and said, Thy blood be
[II.21.2-434]  'vpon thine owne head, for thine owne mouth hath witnessed against
[II.21.2-435]  'thy selfe, in confessing that thou hast slaine the Lords anoynted.

[II.21.2-436]  This example dearely beloued is notable, and the circumstances there­
[II.21.2-437]  of are well to bee considered, for the better instruction of all Subiects
[II.21.2-438]  in their bounden duetie of obedience, and perpetuall fearing of them
[II.21.2-439]  from attempting of any rebellion, or hurt against their Prince. On
[II.21.2-440]  the one part, Dauid was not onely a good and true Subiect, but
[II.21.2-441]  also such a Subiect, as both in peace and warre had serued and sa­
[II.21.2-442]  ued his Princes honour and life, and deliuered his countrey and coun­
[II.21.2-443]  treymen from great danger of Infidels, forraigne and most cruell ene­

[margin]
1.Reg.8.d.
18.&.g.30.

[margin]

[II.21.2-444]  mies, horribly inuading the king, and his countrey: for the which Dauid
[II.21.2-445]  was in a singular fauour with all the people, so that hee might haue
[II.21.2-446]  had great numbers of them at his commandement, if hee would haue at­
[II.21.2-447]  tempted any thing. Besides this, Dauid was no common or absolute

[margin]
1.Reg.16.c.
12.c &c.

[margin]

[II.21.2-448]  subiect but heire apparant to the crowne and kingdome, by GOD ap­

[margin]
0">1.Reg.18c
11.

[margin]

[II.21.2-449]  poynted to reigne after Saul: which as it increased the fauour of the people
[II.21.2-450]  that knew it, towards Dauid, so did it make Dauids cause and case much
[II.21.2-451]  differing from the case of common and absolute subiects. And which is

[margin]
2.Reg.15.
c.11.

[margin]

[II.21.2-452]  most of all, Dauid was highly and singularly in the fauour of GOD: On
[II.21.2-453]  the contrary part, king Saul was out of GODS fauour, (for that cause
[II.21.2-454]  which is before rehearsed) and he as it were GODS enemie, and there­

[margin]
2.Reg.15.
11.

[margin]

[II.21.2-455]  fore like in warre and peace to bee hurtfull and pernitious vnto the com­
[II.21.2-456]  mon wealth, and that was knowen to many of his subiects, for that hee

[margin]
1.Reg.18.
10.12.

[margin]

[II.21.2-457]  was openly rebuked of Samuel for his disobedience vnto GOD, which
[II.21.2-458]  might make the people the lesse to esteeme him. King Saul was also vnto

[margin]
1.Reg.15.
& 22. &
26.

[margin]

[II.21.2-459]  Dauid a mortall and deadly enemie, though without Dauids deseruing,
[II.21.2-460]  who by his faithfull, painefull, profitable, yea most necessary seruice, had
[II.21.2-461]  well deserued, as of his countrey, so of his Prince, but King Saul farre
[II.21.2-462]  otherwise: the more was his vnkindnesse, hatred, and crueltie towardes
[II.21.2-463]  such a good subiect, both odious and detestable. Yet would Dauid nei­
[II.21.2-464]  ther himselfe slay nor hurt such an enemie, for that hee was his Prince
[II.21.2-465]  and Lord, noe would suffer any other to kill, hurt, or lay hand vpon him,
[II.21.2-466]  when he might haue beene slaine without any stirre, tumult, or danger
[II.21.2-467]  of any mans life. Now let Dauid answer to such demands, as men desi­

[margin]
The de­
mande.
[margin]

[II.21.2-468]  rous of rebellion, doe vse to make. Shall not we, specially being so good
[II.21.2-469]  men as we are, rise and rebell against a Prince, hated of GOD, and
[II.21.2-470]  GODS enemy, and therefore like not to prosper either in warre or
[II.21.2-471]  peace, but to be hurtfull and pernicious to the common wealth? No saith

[margin]
The answer.
[margin]

[II.21.2-472]  good and godly Dauid, GODS and such a kings faythfull subiect: and
[II.21.2-473]  so conuicting such subiects as attempt any rebellion against such a king,
[II.21.2-474]  to be neither good subiects nor good men. But say they, Shall we not

[margin]
The de­
mande.
[margin]

[II.21.2-475]  rise and rebell against so vnkinde a Prince, nothing considering or regar­
[II.21.2-476]  ding our true, faythfull, and painefull seruice, or the safegard of our po­
[II.21.2-477]  sterity? No sayth good Dauid, whom no such vnkindnesse could cause to

[margin]
The answer.
The de­
mande.
[margin]

[II.21.2-478]  forsake his due obedience to his soueraigne. Shall we not, say they, rise
[II.21.2-479]  and rebell against our knowen, mortall, and deadly enemy, that seeketh
[II.21.2-480]  our liues? No sayth godly Dauid, who had learned the lesson that our

[margin]
The answer.
[margin]

[II.21.2-481]  Sauiour afterward plainely taught, that wee should doe no hurt to our
[II.21.2-482]  fellow subiects, though they hate vs, and be our enemies: much lesse vnto
[II.21.2-483]  our prince, though he were our enemy. Shall we not assemble an army

[margin]
The de­
mande.
[margin]

[II.21.2-484]  of such good fellowes as we are, and by hazarding of our liues, and the
[II.21.2-485]  liues of such as shall withstand vs, and withall hazarding the whole
[II.21.2-486]  estate of our countrey, remooue so naughty a Prince? No saith godly Da­

[margin]
The answer.
[margin]

[II.21.2-487]  uid, for I, when I might without assembling force, or number of men,
[II.21.2-488]  without tumult or hazard of any mans life, or shedding of any droppe of
[II.21.2-489]  blood, haue deliuered my selfe and my countrey of an euill Prince, yet
[II.21.2-490]  would I not doe it. Are not they (say some) lustie and couragious cap­

[margin]
The de­
mande.
[margin]

[II.21.2-491]  taines, valiant men of stomacke, and good mens bodies, that doe ven­
[II.21.2-492]  ture by force to kill and depose their King, being a naughtie Prince, and
[II.21.2-493]  their mortall enemy? They may be as lusty and couragious as they list,

[margin]
The answer.
[margin]

[II.21.2-494]  yet saith godly Dauid, they can be no good nor godly men that so doe: for
[II.21.2-495]  I not onely haue rebuked, but also commanded him to be slaine as a wic­
[II.21.2-496]  ked man, which slew king Saul mine enemy, though hee being weary of
[II.21.2-497]  his life for the losse of the victorie against his enemies, desired that man to
[II.21.2-498]  slay him. What shall we then doe to an euill, to an vnkinde Prince, an

[margin]
The de­
mande.
The answer.
[margin]

[II.21.2-499]  enemy to vs, hated of GOD, hurtfull to the common wealth, &c. Lay
[II.21.2-500]  no violent hand vpon him, saith good Dauid, but let him liue vntill GOD
[II.21.2-501]  appoint and worke his end, either by naturall death, or in warre by
[II.21.2-502]  lawfull enemies, not by traiterous subiects.

[II.21.2-503]  Thus would godly Dauid make answer: And S. Paul as ye heard before,
[II.21.2-504]  willeth vs also to pray for such a Prince. If king Dauid would make these
[II.21.2-505]  answeres, as by his deedes and words recorded in the holy Scriptures,
[II.21.2-506]  indeed he doth make vnto all such demands concerning rebelling against
[II.21.2-507]  euill princes, vnkinde princes, cruell princes, princes that bee to their
[II.21.2-508]  good subiects mortall enemies, princes that are out of GODS fauour,
[II.21.2-509]  and so hurtfull, or like to be hurtfull to the common wealth: what an­

[margin]
An vnnatu­
rall and wic­
ked question.
[margin]

[II.21.2-510]  swere thinke you, would he make to those that demand, whether they
[II.21.2-511]  (being noughty and vnkinde subiects) may not, to the great hazarde of
[II.21.2-512]  the life of many thousands, and the vtter danger of the state of the com­
[II.21.2-513]  mon wealth, and whole Realme, assemble a sort of rebels, either to de­
[II.21.2-514]  pose, to put in feare, or to destroy their naturall and louing princes, ene­
[II.21.2-515]  my to none, good to all, euen to them the worst of all other, the maintay­
[II.21.2-516]  ner of perpetuall peace, quietnesse, and security, most beneficiall to the
[II.21.2-517]  common wealth, most necessary for the safegard of the whole Realme?
[II.21.2-518]  what answere would Dauid make to their demand, whether they may
[II.21.2-519]  not attempt cruelly and vnnaturally to destroy so peaceable and merci­
[II.21.2-520]  full a Prince, what I say would Dauid, so reuerently speaking of Saul,
[II.21.2-521]  and so patiently suffering so euill a king, what would he answere and say
[II.21.2-522]  to such demandes? What would he say, nay what would hee doe to such
[II.21.2-523]  high attempters, whoso sayd and did as you before haue heard, vnto him
[II.21.2-524]  that slew the king his master, though a most wicked prince? If hee puni­
[II.21.2-525]  shed with death as a wicked doer, such a man: With what reproches of
[II.21.2-526]  wordes would he reuile such, yea with what torments of most shamefull
[II.21.2-527]  deaths would he destroy such hell hounds rather then euill men, such re­
[II.21.2-528]  bels I meane, as I last spake of? For if they who doe disobey an euill and
[II.21.2-529]  vnkinde prince, bee most vnlike vnto Dauid that good subiect: what bee
[II.21.2-530]  they, who doe rebell against a most naturall and louing prince? And if
[II.21.2-531]  Dauid being so good a Subiect, that he obeyed so euill a king, was wor­
[II.21.2-532]  thy of a subiect to be made a king himselfe: What bee they, which are so
[II.21.2-533]  euill subiects that they will rebell against their gratious prince, worthy
[II.21.2-534]  of? Surely no mortall man can expresse with wordes, nor conceiue in
[II.21.2-535]  minde the horrible and most dreadfull damnation that such be worthy of:
[II.21.2-536]  who disdayning to be the quiet and happy subiects of their good prince,
[II.21.2-537]  are most worthy to be the miserable captiues and vile slaues of that infer­
[II.21.2-538]  nall tyrant Satan, with him to suffer eternall slauery and torments.
[II.21.2-539]  This one example of the good subiect Dauid out of the old Testament may
[II.21.2-540]  suffice, and for the notablenesse of it serue for all.

[margin]
Luke 2.a 1.
[margin]

[II.21.2-541]  In the New Testament the excellent example of the blessed Virgin Ma­
[II.21.2-542]  ry
the mother of our Sauiour Christ, doeth at the first offer it selfe. When
[II.21.2-543]  proclamation or commandement was sent into Iurie from Augustus the
[II.21.2-544]  Emperour of Rome , that the people there should repayre vnto their owne
[II.21.2-545]  Cities and dwelling places, there to be taxed: neither did the blessed Vir­
[II.21.2-546]  gin, though both highly in GODS fauour, and also being of the roy­
[II.21.2-547]  all blood of the ancient naturall Kings of Iurie, disdayne to obey the
[II.21.2-548]  commandement of an Heathen and forreigne prince, when GOD had
[II.21.2-549]  placed such a one ouer them: Neither did shee alleage for an excuse, that
[II.21.2-550]  shee was great with child, and most neere her time of deliuerance: Nei­
[II.21.2-551]  ther grudged shee at the length and tedious iourney from Nazareth to
[II.21.2-552]  Bethlehem, from whence and whither she must goe to bee taxed: Nei­
[II.21.2-553]  ther repined shee at the sharpenesse of the dead time of Winter, being
[II.21.2-554]  the latter end of December, an vnfit time to trauaile in, specially a
[II.21.2-555]  longe iourney for a woman beeing in her case: but all excuses set apart,
[II.21.2-556]  shee obeyed, and came to the appointed place, whereat her comming she

[margin]
Luke 2.a.7.
[margin]

[II.21.2-557]  found such great resort and throng of people, that finding no place in
[II.21.2-558]  any Inne, shee was faine after her long painefull and tedious iour­
[II.21.2-559]  ney, to take vp her lodging in a stable, where also shee was deliuered
[II.21.2-560]  of her blessed Childe: and this also declareth how neere her time shee
[II.21.2-561]  tooke that iourney. This obedience of this most noble, and most ver­
[II.21.2-562]  tuous Lady, to a forraigne and pagan Prince, doth well teach vs (who
[II.21.2-563]  in comparison of her are most base and vile) what ready obedience wee
[II.21.2-564]  doe owe to our naturall and gratious Soueraigne. Howbeit, in this
[II.21.2-565]  case the obedience of the whole Iewish nation (beeing otherwise a stub­
[II.21.2-566]  borne people) vnto the commandement of the same forraigne heathen

[margin]
Luke 2.a.3.
[margin]

[II.21.2-567]  Prince, doeth prooue, that such Christians as doe not most readily obey
[II.21.2-568]  their naturall gratious Soueraigne, are far worse then the stubborne
[II.21.2-569]  Iewes, whom we yet account as the worst of all people. But no exam­
[II.21.2-570]  ple ought to bee of more force with vs Christians, then the example of

[margin]
Matth.17.d
25.&c.

[margin]

[II.21.2-571]  Christ our Master and Sauiour, who though hee were the Sonne of

[margin]
Mar.12.b.
17.

[margin]

[II.21.2-572]  GOD, yet did alwayes behaue himselfe most reuerently to such men as
[II.21.2-573]  were in authority in the world in his time, and hee not rebelliously be­

[margin]
Luke 20.d.
15.

[margin]

[II.21.2-574]  haued himselfe, but openly did teach the Iewes to pay tribute vnto the
[II.21.2-575]  Romane Emperour, though a forraigne and a pagan Prince, yea him­

[margin]
Matt.27.a.
[margin]

[II.21.2-576]  selfe with his Apostles payd tribute vnto him: and finally, being brought

[margin]
Luke 23.1.
[margin]

[II.21.2-577]  before Pontius Pilate, a stranger borne, and an heathen man, being Lord

[margin]
Iohn 19.
20.

[margin]

[II.21.2-578]  president of Iurie, he acknowledged his authority and power to bee gi­

[margin]
Matt.17.c.
26.

[margin]

[II.21.2-579]  uen him from GOD, and obeyed patiently the sentence of most paine­
[II.21.2-580]  full and shamefull death, which the sayd Iudge pronounced and gaue

[margin]
Luke 23.d.
24.

[margin]

[II.21.2-581]  most vniustly against him, without any grudge, murmuring, or euill
[II.21.2-582]  word once giuing.

[II.21.2-583]  There bee many and diuers other examples of the obedience to Prin­
[II.21.2-584]  ces, euen such as bee euill, in the new Testament, to the vtter confusi­
[II.21.2-585]  on of disobedient and rebellious people, but this one may be an eternall
[II.21.2-586]  example, which the Sonne of GOD, and so the Lord of all, Iesus
[II.21.2-587]  Christ hath giuen to vs his Christians and seruants, and such as may
[II.21.2-588]  serue for all, to teach vs to obey Princes, though strangers, wicked, and
[II.21.2-589]  wrongfull, when GOD for our sinnes shall place such ouer vs. Where­
[II.21.2-590]  by it followeth vnauoidably, that such as doe disobey or rebell against
[II.21.2-591]  their owne naturall gratious Soueraignes, howsoeuer they call them­
[II.21.2-592]  selues, or be named of others, yet are they indeede no true Christians, but
[II.21.2-593]  worse then Iewes, worse then Heathens, and such as shall neuer enioy
[II.21.2-594]  the Kingdome of heauen, which Christ by his obedience purchased for
[II.21.2-595]  true Christians, being obedient to him the King of all kings, and to
[II.21.2-596]  their Prince whom he hath placed ouer them: The which kingdome the
[II.21.2-597]  peculiar place of all such obedient subiectes, I beseech GOD our hea­
[II.21.2-598]  uenly Father, for the same our Sauiour Iesus Christes sake to grant
[II.21.2-599]  vnto vs, to whom with the holy Ghost be all laude, honour, and glory,
[II.21.2-600]  now and for euer. Amen.

[II.21.2-601]  Thus haue you heard the second part of this Homily,
[II.21.2-602]  now good people let vs pray.


{P} The Prayer as in that time it
was published.

O Most mighty GOD, the Lord of hostes, the Gouer­
nour of all creatures, the only giuer of all victories,
who alone art able to strengthen the weake against
the mighty, and to vanquish infinite multitudes of
thine enemies with the countenance of a few of thy seruants
calling vpon thy Name, and trusting in thee: Defend O
Lord, thy seruant & our Gouernour vnder thee, our Queene
Elizabeth and all thy people committed to her charge, O Lord
withstand the crueltie of all those which be common enemies
as well to the trueth of thy eternall Word, as to their owne
naturall Prince and countrey, and manifestly to this Crowne
and Realme of England , which thou hast of thy diuine pro­
uidence assigned in these our dayes to the gouernment of thy
seruant, our Soueraigne & gracious Queene. O most mer­
cifull Father, (if it be thy holy will) make soft and tender the
stonie hearts of all those that exalt themselues against thy
Trueth, and seeke either to trouble the quiet of this Realme
of England, or to oppresse the Crowne of the same, and con­
uert them to the knowledge of thy Sonne the onely Saui­
our of the world, Iesus Christ, that we and they may ioyntly
glorifie thy mercies. Lighten we beseech thee their ignorant
hearts to imbrace the truth of thy Word, or els so abate their
cruelty (O most mighty Lord) that this our Christian Realm,
with others that confesse thy holy Gospel, may obtaine by
thine aide and strength, suretie from all enemies, without
shedding of Christian blood, whereby all they which bee op­
pressed with their tyrannie, may be relieued, and they which
bee in feare of their crueltie, may bee comforted: and finally
that all Christian Realmes, and specially this Realme
of England, may by thy defence and protection continue in
the trueth of the Gospel, and enioy perfect peace, quietnesse,
and securitie: and that we for these thy mercies, ioyntly alto­
gether with one consonant heart and voice, may thankefully
render to thee all laud and praise, that we knit in one god­
ly concord and vnitie amongst our selues, may continu­
ally magnifie thy glorious Name, who with thy son
our Sauiour Iesus Christ, and the holy Ghost,
art one Eternall, Almightie, and most
mercifull GOD: To whom be
all laud, and praise world
without end,
Amen.


{P} The third part of the Homily against
disobedience and wilfull rebellion.

[II.21.3-603]  AS I haue in the first part of this treatise shewed vnto
[II.21.3-604]  you the doctrine of the holy Scriptures, as concerning the
[II.21.3-605]  obedience of true subiects to their princes, euen as well
[II.21.3-606]  to such as be euill, as vnto the good, and in the second part
[II.21.3-607]  of the same treaty confirmed the same doctrine by notable
[II.21.3-608]  examples, likewise taken out of the holy Scriptures: so
[II.21.3-609]  remayneth it now that I partly doe declare vnto you in
[II.21.3-610]  this third part, what an abominable sin against GOD and man rebelli­
[II.21.3-611]  on is, and how dreadfully the wrath of GOD is kindled and inflamed
[II.21.3-612]  against all rebels, and what horrible plagues, punishments, and deaths,
[II.21.3-613]  and finally eternall damnation doeth hang ouer their heads: as how on
[II.21.3-614]  the contrary part, good and obedient subiects are in GODS fauour,
[II.21.3-615]  and be partakers of peace, quietnesse, and security, with other GODS
[II.21.3-616]  manifold blessings in this world, and by his mercies through our Saui­
[II.21.3-617]  our Christ, of life euerlasting also in the world to come. How horrible a
[II.21.3-618]  sinne against GOD and man rebellion is, cannot possibly bee expressed
[II.21.3-619]  according vnto the greatnesse thereof. For he that nameth rebellion, na­
[II.21.3-620]  meth not a singular or one onely sinne, as is theft, robbery, murder, and
[II.21.3-621]  such like, but he nameth the whole puddle and sinke of all sinnes against
[II.21.3-622]  GOD and man, against his Prince, his country, his countrymen, his
[II.21.3-623]  parents, his children, his kins folkes, his friends, and against all men v­
[II.21.3-624]  niuersally, all sinnes I say against GOD and all men heaped together
[II.21.3-625]  nameth he, that nameth rebellion. For concerning the offence of GODS
[II.21.3-626]  Maiesty, who seeth not that rebellion riseth first by contempt of GOD
[II.21.3-627]  and of his holy ordinances and lawes, wherein hee so straitely comman­
[II.21.3-628]  deth obedience, forbiddeth disobedience and rebellion? And besides the
[II.21.3-629]  dishonour done by rebels vnto GODS holy Name, by their breaking
[II.21.3-630]  of their oath made to their Prince, with the attestation of GODS
[II.21.3-631]  name, and calling of his Maiesty to witnesse: Who heareth not the hor­
[II.21.3-632]  rible oathes and blasphemies of GODS holy name, that are vsed day­
[II.21.3-633]  ly amongst rebels, that is either amongst them, or heareth the trueth of
[II.21.3-634]  their behauiour? Who knoweth not that rebels doe not onely themselues
[II.21.3-635]  leaue all workes necessary to be done vpon workedayes, vndone, whiles
[II.21.3-636]  they accomplish their abominable worste of rebellion, and to compell o­
[II.21.3-637]  thers that would gladly be well occupied, to doe the same: but also how
[II.21.3-638]  rebels doe not onely leaue the Sabboth day of the Lord vnsanctified, the
[II.21.3-639]  Temple and Church of the Lord vnresorted vnto, but also doe by their
[II.21.3-640]  workes of wickednesse most horribly prophane and pollute the Sabboth
[II.21.3-641]  day, seruing Satan, and by doing of his worke, making it the deuils day,
[II.21.3-642]  in steede of the Lords day? Besides that, they compell good men that
[II.21.3-643]  would gladly serue the Lord assembling in his Temple and Church vpon
[II.21.3-644]  his day, as becommeth the Lords seruants, to assemble and meete armed
[II.21.3-645]  in the field, to resist the furie of such rebels. Yea, & many rebels, lest they
[II.21.3-646]  should leaue any part of GODS commandements in the first table of
[II.21.3-647]  his Law vnbroken, or any sinne against GOD vndone, doe make re­
[II.21.3-648]  bellion for the maintenance of their Images and Idols, and of their ido­
[II.21.3-649]  latrie committed, or to bee committed by them: and in dispite of GOD,
[II.21.3-650]  cut and teare in sunder his holy word, and treade it vnder their feete, as
[II.21.3-651]  of late yee know was done.

[II.21.3-652]  As concerning the second table of GODS Law, and all sinnes that
[II.21.3-653]  may bee committed against man, who seeth not that they bee contained
[II.21.3-654]  in rebellion? For first the rebels doe not onely dishonour their Prince,

[margin]
The fifth
comman­
dement.
[margin]

[II.21.3-655]  the parent of their countrey, but also do dishonour and shame their natu­
[II.21.3-656]  rall parents, if they haue any, doe shame their kinred and friendes, doe­
[II.21.3-657]  disinherite & vndoe for euer their children and heyres. Theftes, robberies,
[II.21.3-658]  and murders, which of all sinnes are most lothed of most men, are in no

[margin]
The sixt and
eight com­
mandement.
[margin]

[II.21.3-659]  men so much nor so pernitiously and mischieuously, as in rebels. For the
[II.21.3-660]  most arrant theeues, cruellest murderers that euer were, so long as they
[II.21.3-661]  refraine from rebellion, as they are not many in number, so spreadeth
[II.21.3-662]  their wickednesse and damnation vnto a few, they spoyle but a few, they
[II.21.3-663]  shed the blood but of a few in comparison. But rebels are the cause of in­
[II.21.3-664]  finite robberies, and murders of great multitudes, and of those also
[II.21.3-665]  whom they should defend from the spoyle and violence of other: and as
[II.21.3-666]  rebels are many in number, so doeth their wickednesse and damnation
[II.21.3-667]  spread it selfe vnto many. And if whoredome and adulterie amongst

[margin]
The seuenth
commande­
ment.
[margin]

[II.21.3-668]  such persons as are agreeable to such wickednesse, are (as they indeede
[II.21.3-669]  bee most damnable:) what are the forceable oppressions of matrons and
[II.21.3-670]  mens wiues, and the violating and deflowring of virgins and maides,
[II.21.3-671]  which are most rife with rebels? How horrible and damnable thinke
[II.21.3-672]  you are they? Now besides that, rebels by breach of their faith giuen,

[margin]
The ninth
commande­
ment.
[margin]

[II.21.3-673]  and the oath made to their Prince, bee guiltie of most damnable periu­
[II.21.3-674]  rie: it is wonderous to see what false colors and fained causes, by slande­
[II.21.3-675]  rous lies made vpon their Prince, and the councellers, rebels will deuise
[II.21.3-676]  to cloke their rebellion withall, which is the worst and most damnable of
[II.21.3-677]  all false witnesse bearing that may be possible. For what should I speake
[II.21.3-678]  of coueting or desiring of other mens wiues, houses, landes, goods and

[margin]
The tenth
comman­
dement.
[margin]

[II.21.3-679]  seruants in rebels, who by their willes would leaue vnto no man anie
[II.21.3-680]  thing of his owne?

[II.21.3-681]  Thus you see that all good lawes are by rebels violated and broken,
[II.21.3-682]  and that all sinnes possible to bee committed against GOD or man, bee
[II.21.3-683]  contained in rebellion: which sinnes if a man list to name by the accusto­
[II.21.3-684]  med names of the seuen capitall or deadly sinnes, as pride, enuy, wrath,
[II.21.3-685]  couetousnesse, sloth, gluttonie, and lecherie, he shall finde them all in re­
[II.21.3-686]  bellion, and amongst rebels. For first, as ambition and desire to be aloft,
[II.21.3-687]  which is &that; property of pride, stirreth vp many mens minds to rebellion, so
[II.21.3-688]  commeth it of a Luciferian pride and presumption, that a few rebellious
[II.21.3-689]  subiects should set themselues vp against the Maiesty of their Prince,
[II.21.3-690]  against the wisedome of the counsellers, against the power and force of
[II.21.3-691]  all Nobility, and the faithfull subiects and people of the whole Realme.
[II.21.3-692]  As for enuie, wrath, murder, and desire of blood, and couetousnesse of other
[II.21.3-693]  mens goodes, landes and liuings, they are the inseparable accidents of
[II.21.3-694]  all rebels, and peculiar properties that doe vsually stirre vp wicked men
[II.21.3-695]  vnto rebellion.

[II.21.3-696]  Now such as by riotousnesse, gluttony, drunkennesse, excesse of ap­
[II.21.3-697]  parell, and vnthrifty games, haue wasted their owne goodes vnthrifti­
[II.21.3-698]  tily, the same are most apt vnto, and most desirous of rebellion, whereby
[II.21.3-699]  they trust to come by other mens goodes vnlawfully and violently. And
[II.21.3-700]  where other gluttons and drunkardes take too much of such meats and
[II.21.3-701]  drinkes as are serued to tables, rebels waste and consume in short space,
[II.21.3-702]  all corne in barnes, fieldes, or elsewhere, whole garners, whole store­
[II.21.3-703]  houses, whole cellers, deuoure whole flockes of sheepe, whole droues of
[II.21.3-704]  Oxen and Kine. And as rebels that are married, leauing their owne
[II.21.3-705]  wiues at home, doe most vngraciously: so much more do vnmarried men,
[II.21.3-706]  worse then any stallands or horses (being now by rebellion set at liber­
[II.21.3-707]  ty from correction of Lawes which brideled them before) abuse by force
[II.21.3-708]  other mens wiues, and daughters, and rauish virgins and maydens,
[II.21.3-709]  most shamefully, abominably, and damnably.

[II.21.3-710]  Thus all sinnes, by all names that sinnes may be named, and by all
[II.21.3-711]  meanes that sinnes may be committed and wrought, doe all wholly vp­
[II.21.3-712]  on heapes follow rebellion, and are to bee found altogether amongst re­
[II.21.3-713]  bels. Now whereas pestilence, famine, and warre, are by the holy

[margin]
2.King.24.
cap.14.

[margin]

[II.21.3-714]  Scriptures declared to bee the greatest worldly plagues and miseries
[II.21.3-715]  that likely can be, it is euident, that all the miseries that all these
[II.21.3-716]  plagues haue in them, doe wholly altogether follow rebellion, where­
[II.21.3-717]  in, as all their miseries bee, so is there much more mischiefe then
[II.21.3-718]  in them all.

[II.21.3-719]  For it is knowen that in the resorting of great companies of
[II.21.3-720]  men together, which in rebellion happeneth both vpon the part of
[II.21.3-721]  true subiectes, and of the rebels, by their close lying together, and
[II.21.3-722]  corruption of the ayre and place where they doe lie, with ordure
[II.21.3-723]  and much filth, in the hot weather, and by vnwholesome lodging,
[II.21.3-724]  and lying often vpon the ground, specially in colde and wet wea­
[II.21.3-725]  ther in Winter, by their vnwholesome diet, and feeding at all times,
[II.21.3-726]  and often by famine and lacke of meate and drinke in due time, and
[II.21.3-727]  againe by taking too much at other times: It is well knowen, I
[II.21.3-728]  say, that aswell plagues and pestilences, as all other kindes of
[II.21.3-729]  sickenesses and maladies by these meanes growe vp and spring a­
[II.21.3-730]  mongst men, whereby moe men are consumed at the length, then
[II.21.3-731]  are by dint of sword sodainely slaine in the field. So that not onely
[II.21.3-732]  pestilences, but also all other sickenesses, diseases, and maladies, doe
[II.21.3-733]  follow rebellion, which are much more horrible then plagues, pesti­
[II.21.3-734]  lences, and diseases sent directly from GOD, as hereafter shall appeare
[II.21.3-735]  more plainely.

[II.21.3-736]  And as for hunger and famine, they are the peculiar companions of
[II.21.3-737]  rebellion: for while rebels doe in short time spoile and consume all corne
[II.21.3-738]  and necessary prouision, which men with their labours had gotten and
[II.21.3-739]  appointed vpon, for their finding the whole yeere after, and also doe let
[II.21.3-740]  all other men, husbandmen and others, from their husbandry, and other
[II.21.3-741]  necessary workes, whereby prouision should bee made for times to come,
[II.21.3-742]  who seeth not that extreame famine and hunger must needes shortly en­
[II.21.3-743]  sue and follow rebellion? Now whereas the wise King & godly Prophet
[II.21.3-744]  Dauid iudged warre to be worse then either famine or pestilence, for that
[II.21.3-745]  these two are often suffered by GOD, for mans amendement, and be not

[margin]
2.Reg.24.
c.14.

[margin]

[II.21.3-746]  sinnes of themselues: but warres haue alwayes the sins and mischiefes
[II.21.3-747]  of men vpon the one side or other ioyned with them, and therefore is war
[II.21.3-748]  the greatest of these worldly mischiefes: but of all warres, ciuill warre
[II.21.3-749]  is the worst, and farre more abominable yet is rebellion then any ciuill
[II.21.3-750]  warre, being vnworthy the name of any warre, so farre it exceedeth all
[II.21.3-751]  warres in all naughtinesse, in all mischiefe, and in all abomination. And
[II.21.3-752]  therefore our Sauiour Christ denounceth desolation and destruction to

[margin]
Mat.12.b.
[margin]

[II.21.3-753]  that Realme, that by sedition and rebellion is diuided in it selfe.

[II.21.3-754]  Now as I haue shewed before, that pestilence and famine, so is it yet
[II.21.3-755]  more euident that all the calamities, miseries, and mischiefes of warre,
[II.21.3-756]  be more grieuous and doe more follow rebellion, then any other warre,
[II.21.3-757]  as being farre worse then all other warres. For not onely those ordinarie
[II.21.3-758]  and vsuall mischiefes and miseries of other warres, doe follow rebellion,
[II.21.3-759]  as corne, and other things, necessary to mans vse to be spoiled, Houses,
[II.21.3-760]  Villages, Townes, Cities, to be taken, sacked, burned, and destroyed,
[II.21.3-761]  not onely many very wealthy men, but whole countreys to be impoueri­
[II.21.3-762]  shed, and vtterly beggered, many thousands of men to be slaine and mur­
[II.21.3-763]  dered, women and maides to be violated and deflowred: which things
[II.21.3-764]  when they are done by forraine enemies, we doe much mourne, as wee
[II.21.3-765]  haue great causes, yet are all these miseries without any wickednesse
[II.21.3-766]  wrought by any of our owne countreymen. But when these mischiefes
[II.21.3-767]  are wrought in rebellion by them that should be friends, by countreymen,
[II.21.3-768]  by kinsemen, by those that should defend their countrey, and countrey­
[II.21.3-769]  men from such miseries, the misery is nothing so great, as is the mis­
[II.21.3-770]  chiefe and wickednes when the Subiects vnnaturally doe rebell against
[II.21.3-771]  their Prince, whose honour and life they should defend, though it were
[II.21.3-772]  with the losse of their owne liues: countreymen to disturbe the publique
[II.21.3-773]  peace and quietnesse of their countrey, for defence of whose quietnesse
[II.21.3-774]  they should spend their liues: the brother to seeke, and often to worke the
[II.21.3-775]  death of his brother, the sonne of the father, the father to seeke or procure
[II.21.3-776]  the death of his sons, being at mans age, and by their faults to disinherite
[II.21.3-777]  their innocent children and kinsemen their heires for euer, for whom
[II.21.3-778]  they might purchase liuings and lands, as naturall Parents doe take
[II.21.3-779]  care and paines, and to be at great costes and charges: and vniuersally
[II.21.3-780]  in stead of all quietnesse, ioy, and felicitie, which doe follow blessed peace &
[II.21.3-781]  due obedience, to bring in all trouble, sorrow, disquietnes of minds & bo­
[II.21.3-782]  dies & all mischiefe & calamitie, to turne all good order vpside downe,
[II.21.3-783]  to bring all good lawes in contempt, and to treade them vnder feete, to
[II.21.3-784]  oppresse all vertue and honestie, and all vertuous and honest persons,
[II.21.3-785]  and to set all vice and wickednesse, and all vicious and wicked men at
[II.21.3-786]  libertie, to worke their wicked willes, which were before bridled by
[II.21.3-787]  wholsome Lawes, to weaken, to ouerthrow, and to consume the strength
[II.21.3-788]  of the Realme their naturall Countrey, aswell by the spending and
[II.21.3-789]  wasting of monie and treasure of the Prince and Realme, as by mur­
[II.21.3-790]  dering the people of the same, their owne countrimen, who should de­
[II.21.3-791]  fend the honour of their Prince, and libertie of their Countrie, against

[margin]
Prou.14.
[margin]

[II.21.3-792]  the inuasion of forraigne enemies: and so finally, to make their countrie
[II.21.3-793]  thus by their mischeefe weakened, ready to bee a pray and spoyle to all
[II.21.3-794]  outwarde enemies that will inuade it, to the vtter and perpetuall cap­
[II.21.3-795]  tiuitie, slauerie, and destruction of all their countriemen, their chil­
[II.21.3-796]  dren, their friendes, their kinsefolkes left aliue, whom by their wick­
[II.21.3-797]  ed rebellion they procure to bee deliuered into the hands of the forraigne
[II.21.3-798]  enemies, as much as in them doeth lie.

[II.21.3-799]  In forraigne warres our countriemen in obtaining the victorie win
[II.21.3-800]  the prayse of valiantnesse, yea and though they were ouercommed and
[II.21.3-801]  slaine, yet winne they an honest commendation in this world, and die
[II.21.3-802]  in a good conscience for seruing GOD, their Prince, and their countrie,
[II.21.3-803]  and bee children of eternall saluation: But the rebellion how desperate
[II.21.3-804]  and strong soeuer they bee, yet winne they shame here in fighting against
[II.21.3-805]  GOD, their Prince and Countrie, and therefore iustly doe fall head­
[II.21.3-806]  long into hell if they die, and liue in shame and fearefull conscience, though
[II.21.3-807]  they escape.

[II.21.3-808]  But commonly they be rewarded with shamefull deathes, their hands
[II.21.3-809]  and carkases set vpon poles, and hanged in chaines, eaten with kytes
[II.21.3-810]  and crowes, iudged vnworthy the honour of buriall, and so their soules,
[II.21.3-811]  if they repent not (as commonly they doe not) the deuill hurrieth them
[II.21.3-812]  into hell, in the middest of their mischiefe. For which dreadfull executi­
[II.21.3-813]  on Saint Paul sheweth the cause of obedience, not onely for feare of death,
[II.21.3-814]  but also in conscience to GOD-ward, for feare of eternall damnation in

[margin]
Rom.13.
[margin]

[II.21.3-815]  the world to come.

[II.21.3-816]  Wherefore good people, let vs, as the children of obedience, feare, the
[II.21.3-817]  dreadfull execution of GOD, and liue in quiet obedience, to bee the
[II.21.3-818]  children of euerlasting Saluation. For as heauen is the place of good
[II.21.3-819]  obedient subiectes, and hell the prison and dungeon of rebels against
[II.21.3-820]  GOD and their Prince: so is that Realme happy where most obedience
[II.21.3-821]  of subiects doth appeare, being the verie figure of heauen: and contra­
[II.21.3-822]  riwise where most rebellions and rebelles bee, there is the expresse si­
[II.21.3-823]  militude of hell, and the rebelles themselues are the verie figures of
[II.21.3-824]  fiendes and deuils, and their captaine the vngratious patterne of Lu­
[II.21.3-825]  cifer
and Satan, the prince of darkenesse, of whose rebellion as they
[II.21.3-826]  bee followers, so shall they of his damnation in hell vndoubtedly bee
[II.21.3-827]  partakers, and as vndoubtedly children of peace the inheritours of
[II.21.3-828]  heauen with GOD the Father, GOD the Sonne, and GOD the
[II.21.3-829]  holy Ghost: To whom bee all honour and glory for euer and euer, A­
[II.21.3-830]  men.

[II.21.3-831]  Thus haue you heard the third part of this Homilie,
[II.21.3-832]  now good people let vs pray.



{P} The Prayer as in that time it
was published.

O Most mighty GOD, the Lord of hostes, the Go­
uernour of al creatures, the only giuer of all victo­
ries, & who alone art able to strengthen the weak
against the mighty, and to vanquish infinite mul­
titudes of thine enemies with the countenance of a few of thy
seruants calling vpon thy Name, & trusting in thee: Defend,
O Lord, thy seruant and our Gouernour vnder thee, our
Queene ELIZABETH, & all thy people committed to her charge:
O Lord withstand the cruelty of all those which be common
enemies aswell to the trueth of thy eternall Word, as to their
owne naturall Prince and countrey, and manifestly to this
Crowne & Realme of England which thou hast of thy diuine
prouidence assigned in these our dayes to the gouernement of
thy seruant, our Soueraigne and gracious Queene, O most
mercifull Father, (if it be thy holy will) make soft and tender
the stony hearts of all those that exalt themselues against thy
Trueth and seeke either to trouble the quiet of this Realme
of England, or to oppresse the Crowne of the same, and con­
uert them to the knowledge of thy Sonne the onely Saui­
our of the world, Iesus Christ, that we and they may ioyntly
glorifie thy mercies. Lighten we beseech thee their ignorant
hearts, to imbrace the truth of thy word, or els so abate their
cruelty (O most mighty Lord) that this our Christian Realme
with others that confesse thy holy Gospel, may obtaine by
thine ayde and strength, surety from all enemies, without
shedding of Christian blood, whereby all they which bee op­
pressed with their tyranny, may bee relieued, and they which
bee in feare of their cruelty, may bee comforted: and finally
that all Christian Realmes, and specially this Realme of
England, may by thy defence and protection continue in
the trueth of the Gospel and enioy perfect peace, quietnesse,
and security: and that wee for these thy mercies, iointly alto­
gether with one consonant heart and voyce, may thankfully
render to thee all laud and prayse, that we knit in one god­
ly concord and vnity amongst our selues, may continu­
ally magnifie thy glorious Name, who with thy son
our Sauiour Iesus Christ and the holy Ghost,
art one Eternall, Almighty, and most
mercifull GOD: To whom be
all laud and prayse world
without end.
Amen.


{P} The fourth part of the Homily against
disobedience and wilfull rebellion.

[II.21.4-833]  FOr your further instruction (good people) to shew
[II.21.4-834]  vnto you how much Almighty GOD doeth abhore
[II.21.4-835]  disobedience and wilfull rebellion, specially when
[II.21.4-836]  rebelles aduance themselues so high, that they
[II.21.4-837]  arme themselues with weapon, and stand in fielde
[II.21.4-838]  to fight against GOD, their Prince, and their
[II.21.4-839]  countrie: it shall not bee out of the way to shew
[II.21.4-840]  some examples set out in Scriptures, written for
[II.21.4-841]  our eternall erudition. Wee may soone know (good people) how hei­
[II.21.4-842]  nous offence the trecherie of rebellion is, if we call to remembrance the
[II.21.4-843]  heauie wrath and dreadfull indignation of Almighty GOD against
[II.21.4-844]  subiectes as doe onely but inwardly grudge, mutter, and murmure a­
[II.21.4-845]  gainst their gouernours though their inward treason so priuily hatched
[II.21.4-846]  in their breastes, come not to open declaration of their doings, as harde
[II.21.4-847]  it is whom the deuill hath so farre entised against GODS word to
[II.21.4-848]  keepe themselues there: no hee meaneth still to blowe the coale, to kindle
[II.21.4-849]  their rebellious hearts to flame into open deedes, if he be not with grace
[II.21.4-850]  speedily withstood.

[II.21.4-851]  Some of the children of Israel, beeing murmurers against their
[II.21.4-852]  Magistrates appoynted ouer them by GOD, were stricken with foule

[margin]
Num.11.a
Num.12.c.
10.
Num.16.

[margin]

[II.21.4-853]  leprosie: many were burnt vp with fire sodainely sent from the Lord:
[II.21.4-854]  sometime a great sort of thousandes were consumed with the pestilence:
[II.21.4-855]  sometime they were stinged to death with a strange kinde of firie Ser­

[margin]
Psal.77.
[margin]

[II.21.4-856]  pents: & (which is most horrible) some of the Captaines with their band
[II.21.4-857]  of murmurers not dying by any vsuall or naturall death of men, but the
[II.21.4-858]  earth opening, they with their wiues, children, and families, were swal­
[II.21.4-859]  lowed quicke downe into hell. Which horrible destructions of such Is­

[margin]
Num.16.
[margin]

[II.21.4-860]  raelites as were murmurers against Moses, appointed by GOD, to
[II.21.4-861]  bee their heade and chiefe Magistrate, are recorded in the booke of Num­
[II.21.4-862]  bers, and other places of the scriptures, for perpetuall memorie and war­
[II.21.4-863]  ninge to all subiects, how highly GOD is displeased with the murmu­
[II.21.4-864]  ringe and euill speaking of subiectes against their princes, for that as

[margin]
Exod 16.b.
7.&c.

[margin]

[II.21.4-865]  the Scripture recordeth, their murmure was not against their prince
[II.21.4-866]  onely, beeing a mortall creature, but against GOD himselfe also. Now
[II.21.4-867]  if such strange and horrible plagues, did fall vpon such subiects as did on­
[II.21.4-868]  ly murmure and speake euill against their heads: what shall become of
[II.21.4-869]  those most wicked impes of the deuill that doe conspire, arme themselues,
[II.21.4-870]  assemble great numbers of armed rebels, and leade them with them a­
[II.21.4-871]  gainst their Prince and countrey, spoyling and robbing, killing, and
[II.21.4-872]  murdering all good subiectes that doe withstand them, as many as they
[II.21.4-873]  may preuaile against? But those examples are written to stay vs, not
[II.21.4-874]  onely from such mischiefes, but also from murmuring, and speaking
[II.21.4-875]  once an euill word against our Prince, which though any should doe ne­
[II.21.4-876]  uer so secretly, yet doe the holy Scriptures shew that the verie birdes
[II.21.4-877]  of the ayre will bewray them: and these so many examples before no­
[II.21.4-878]  ted out of the holy Scriptures doe declare, that they shall not escape

[margin]
Eccle.10.d.
[margin]

[II.21.4-879]  horrible punishment therefore. Now concerning actuall rebellion, a­
[II.21.4-880]  mongst many examples thereof set foorth in the holy Scriptures, the ex­

[margin]
2.Kin.15.c.
12.&17.a.
1.&c.11.&
18.b.7.18.

[margin]

[II.21.4-881]  ample of Absolon is notable: who entring into conspiracie against King
[II.21.4-882]  Dauid his father, both vsed the aduise of very wittie men, and assembled
[II.21.4-883]  a very great and huge company of rebelles: the which Absolon though
[II.21.4-884]  hee were most goodly of person, of great nobilitie, beeing the Kinges
[II.21.4-885]  sonne, in great fauour of the people, and so dearely beloued of the
[II.21.4-886]  king himselfe, so much that hee gaue commandement that (notwith­
[II.21.4-887]  standing his rebellion) his life should bee saued: when for these conside­
[II.21.4-888]  rations, most men were afraide to lay handes vpon him, a great tree
[II.21.4-889]  stretching out his arme, as it were for that purpose, caught him by the

[margin]
2.King.18.
a.5.

[margin]

[II.21.4-890]  great and long bush of his goodly haire, lapping about it as hee fledde
[II.21.4-891]  hastilie bare-headed vnder the saide tree, and so hanged him vp by the
[II.21.4-892]  haire of his head in the ayre, to giue an eternall document, that neither

[margin]
2.King.18.
b.9.

[margin]

[II.21.4-893]  comelinesse of personage, neither nobilitie, nor fauour of the people,
[II.21.4-894]  no nor the fauour of the king himselfe, can saue a rebell from due punish­
[II.21.4-895]  ment: GOD the King of all kings beeing so offended with him, that
[II.21.4-896]  rather then hee should lacke due execution for his treason, euery tree by
[II.21.4-897]  the way will be a gallous or gibbet vnto him, and the haire of his owne
[II.21.4-898]  head will bee vnto him in stead of an halter to hang him vp with, rather
[II.21.4-899]  then he should lacke one. A fearefull example of GODS punishment

[margin]
Achito­
phel.
[margin]

[II.21.4-900]  (good people) to consider. Now Achitophel, though otherwise an exceding
[II.21.4-901]  wise man, yet the mischeeuous counceller of Absolon, in this wicked re­
[II.21.4-902]  bellion, for lacke of an hangman, a conuenient seruitour for such a tray­

[margin]
2.Kin. 15.c.
12.&. 16.d.
21.23.& 17
f.23.

[margin]

[II.21.4-903]  tour, went and hanged vp himselfe. A worthy end of all false rebels,
[II.21.4-904]  who rather then they should lacke due execution, will by GODS
[II.21.4-905]  iust iudgement, become hangmen vnto themselues. Thus happened it
[II.21.4-906]  to the captaines of that rebellion: beside fourtie thousand of rascall re­

[margin]
2.King.18.
c 7.8.9.

[margin]

[II.21.4-907]  bels slaine in the field, and in the chase.

[II.21.4-908]  Likewise is it to bee seene in the holy Scriptures show that great
[II.21.4-909]  rebellion which the traytour Seba moued in Israel, was suddenly appea­

[margin]
2.King.20.
[margin]

[II.21.4-910]  sed, the head of the captaine traytour (by the meanes of a seely woman)
[II.21.4-911]  being cut off. And as the holy Scriptures doe shew, so doeth dayly ex­
[II.21.4-912]  perience prooue, that the counsels, conspiracies, and attempts of rebels,
[II.21.4-913]  neuer tooke effect, neither came to good, but to most horrible ende. For
[II.21.4-914]  though GOD doth oftentimes prosper iust and lawfull enemies, which

[margin]
Psal.20.12.
[margin]

[II.21.4-915]  bee no subiects against their forreigne enemies: yet did hee neuer long
[II.21.4-916]  prosper rebellious subiects against their Prince, were they neuer so great
[II.21.4-917]  in authoritie, or so many in number. Fiue Princes or Kings (for so the
[II.21.4-918]  Scripture tearmeth them) with all their multitudes, could not preuaile

[margin]
Gen.14.
[margin]

[II.21.4-919]  against Chodorlaomer, vnto whom they had promised loyaltie and obedi­
[II.21.4-920]  ence, and had continued in the same certaine yeeres, but they were all
[II.21.4-921]  ouerthrowen and taken prisoners by him: but Abraham with his familie
[II.21.4-922]  and kinsefolkes, an handfull of men in respect, owing no subiection vnto
[II.21.4-923]  Chodorlaomer, ouerthrew him and all his hoste in battell, and recouered
[II.21.4-924]  the prisoners, and deliuered them. So that though warre bee so dread­
[II.21.4-925]  full and cruell a thing, as it is, yet doeth GOD often prosper a few in
[II.21.4-926]  lawfull warres with forreigne enemies against many thousands: but
[II.21.4-927]  neuer yet prospered hee subiects being rebels against their naturall So­
[II.21.4-928]  ueraine, were they neuer so great or noble, so many, so stout, so wittie,
[II.21.4-929]  and politike, but alwayes they came by the ouerthrow, and to a shameful
[II.21.4-930]  ende: so much doeth GOD abhorre rebellion, more then other warres,
[II.21.4-931]  though otherwise being so dreadfull, and so great a destruction to man­
[II.21.4-932]  kinde. Though not onely great multitudes of the rude and rascall com­
[II.21.4-933]  mons, but sometime also men of great wit, nobilitie, and authoritie, haue
[II.21.4-934]  mooued rebellions against their lawfull Princes whereas true nobility
[II.21.4-935]  should most abhorre such villanous, and true wisedome should most de­
[II.21.4-936]  test such franticke rebellion) though they should pretend sundry causes,
[II.21.4-937]  as the redresse of the common wealth (which rebellion of all other mis­
[II.21.4-938]  chiefes doeth most destroy) or reformation of religion (whereas rebellion
[II.21.4-939]  is most against all true religion) though they haue made a great shew of
[II.21.4-940]  holy meaning by beginning their rebellions with a counterfeit seruice of
[II.21.4-941]  GOD, (as did wicked Absolon begin his rebellion with sacrificing vnto

[margin]
2.Reg.15.
c.12.

[margin]

[II.21.4-942]  GOD) though they display, and beare about ensignes, and banners,
[II.21.4-943]  which are acceptable vnto the rude ignorant common people, great mul­
[II.21.4-944]  titudes of whom by such false pretences and shewes they doe deceiue, and
[II.21.4-945]  draw vnto them: yet were the multitudes of the rebels neuer so huge
[II.21.4-946]  and great, the captaines neuer so noble, politike and wittie, the preten­
[II.21.4-947]  ces fained to bee neuer so good and holy, yet the speedie ouerthrow of all
[II.21.4-948]  rebels, of what number, state, or condition soeuer they were, or what co­
[II.21.4-949]  lour or cause soeuer they pretended, is, and euer hath beene such, that
[II.21.4-950]  GOD thereby doeth shew that hee alloweth neither the dignitie of any
[II.21.4-951]  person, nor the multitude of any people, nor the weight of any cause, as
[II.21.4-952]  sufficient for the which the subiectes may mooue rebellion against their
[II.21.4-953]  Princes.

[II.21.4-954]  Turne ouer and reade the histories of all Nations, looke ouer the Chro­
[II.21.4-955]  nicles of our owne countrey, call to minde so many rebellions of old time,
[II.21.4-956]  and some yet fresh in memorie, yee shall not finde that GOD euer
[II.21.4-957]  prospered any rebellion against their naturall and lawfull Prince, but
[II.21.4-958]  contrariwise that the rebels were ouerthrowen and slaine, and such as
[II.21.4-959]  were taken prisoners dreadfully executed. Consider the great and noble
[II.21.4-960]  families of Dukes, Marquesses, Earles, and other Lords, whose names
[II.21.4-961]  yee shall reade in our Chronicles, now cleane extinguished and gone, and
[II.21.4-962]  seeke out the causes of the decay, you shall finde, that not lacke of issue
[II.21.4-963]  and heires male hath so much wrought that decay, and waste of noble
[II.21.4-964]  bloods and houses, as hath rebellion.

[II.21.4-965]  And for so much as the redresse of the common wealth hath of old bene
[II.21.4-966]  the vsuall fained pretence of rebels, and religion now of late beginneth
[II.21.4-967]  to bee a colour of rebellion: let all godly and discreete subiects consider
[II.21.4-968]  well of both, and first concerning religion. If peaceable King Salomon
[II.21.4-969]  was iudged of GOD to bee more meete to build his Temple (whereby
[II.21.4-970]  the ordering of religion is meant) then his father King Dauid, though
[II.21.4-971]  otherwise a most godly King, for that Dauid was a great warriour, and
[II.21.4-972]  had shedde much blood, though it were in his warres against the enemies
[II.21.4-973]  of GOD: of this may all godly and reasonable subiects consider, that
[II.21.4-974]  a peaceable Prince, specially our most peaceable and mercifull Queene,
[II.21.4-975]  who hath hitherto shed no blood at all, no not of her most deadly enemies,
[II.21.4-976]  is more like and farre meeter either to set vp, or to maintaine true religi­
[II.21.4-977]  on, then are bloody rebels, who haue not shed the blood of GODS ene­
[II.21.4-978]  mies, as king Dauid had done, but doe seeke to shed the blood of GODS
[II.21.4-979]  friends, of their owne countreymen, and of their owne most deare friends
[II.21.4-980]  and kinsefolke, yea the destruction of their most gracious Prince and na­
[II.21.4-981]  turall countrey, for defence of whom they ought to bee ready to shedde
[II.21.4-982]  their blood, if neede should so require. What a religion it is that such
[II.21.4-983]  men by such meanes would restore, may easily bee iudged: euen as good
[II.21.4-984]  a religion surely, as rebels bee good men and obedient subiects, and as re­
[II.21.4-985]  bellion is a good meane of redresse and reformation, being it selfe the grea­
[II.21.4-986]  test deformation of all that may possible bee. But as the trueth of the
[II.21.4-987]  Gospel of our Sauiour Christ, being quietly and soberly taught, though
[II.21.4-988]  it doe cost them their liues that doe teach it, is able to maintaine the true
[II.21.4-989]  Religion: so hath a franticke religion neede of such furious maintenan­
[II.21.4-990]  ces as is rebellion, and of such patrons as are rebels, being ready not to
[II.21.4-991]  die for the true Religion, but to kill all that shall or dare speake against
[II.21.4-992]  their false superstition and wicked idolatrie. Now concerning preten­
[II.21.4-993]  ces of any redresse of the common wealth, made by rebels, euery man
[II.21.4-994]  that hath but halfe an eye, may see how vaine they bee, rebellion
[II.21.4-995]  being as I haue before declared, the greatest ruine and destruction of
[II.21.4-996]  all common wealths that may bee possible. And who so looketh on the
[II.21.4-997]  one part vpon the persons and gouernement of the Queenes most honou­
[II.21.4-998]  rable Counsellers, by the experiment of so many yeeres prooued honou­
[II.21.4-999]  rable to her Maiestie, and most profitable and beneficiall vnto our coun­
[II.21.4-1000]  trey and countreymen, and on the other part, considereth the persons,
[II.21.4-1001]  state and conditions of the rebels themselues, the reformers, as they take
[II.21.4-1002]  vpon them, of the present gouernement, hee shall finde that the most rash
[II.21.4-1003]  and hairebrained men, the greatest vnthriftes, that haue most lewdly
[II.21.4-1004]  wasted their owne goods and landes, those that are ouer the eares in
[II.21.4-1005]  debt, and such as for their theftes, robberies, and murders, dare not in
[II.21.4-1006]  any well gouerned common wealth, where good Lawes are in force,
[II.21.4-1007]  shew their faces, such as are of most lewd and wicked behauiour and life,
[II.21.4-1008]  and all such as will not, or cannot liue in peace, are alwayes most ready
[II.21.4-1009]  to mooue rebellion, or take part with rebels. And are not these meete
[II.21.4-1010]  men, trow you, to restore the common wealth decayed, who haue so
[II.21.4-1011]  spoyled and consumed all their owne wealth and thrift? and very like
[II.21.4-1012]  to amend other mens maners, who haue so vile vices, and abominable
[II.21.4-1013]  conditions themselues? Surely that which they falsely call reforma­
[II.21.4-1014]  tion, is indeede not onely a defacing or a deformation, but also an vtter
[II.21.4-1015]  destruction of all common wealth, as would well appeare, might the
[II.21.4-1016]  rebels haue their wils, and doth right well and too well appeare by their
[II.21.4-1017]  doing in such places of the countrey where rebels doe rout, where though
[II.21.4-1018]  they tary but a very little while, they make such reformation that they
[II.21.4-1019]  destroy all places, and vndoe all men where they come, that the childe yet
[II.21.4-1020]  vnborne may rue it, and shall many yeeres hereafter curse them.

[II.21.4-1021]  Let no good and discreete subiectes therefore follow the flagge or ban­
[II.21.4-1022]  ner displayed to rebellion, and borne by rebels, though it haue the image
[II.21.4-1023]  of the plough painted therein, with God speede the plough, written vnder
[II.21.4-1024]  in great letters, knowing that none hinder the plough more then re­
[II.21.4-1025]  bels, who will neyther goe to the plough themselues, nor suffer other
[II.21.4-1026]  that would goe vnto it. And though some rebels beare the picture of
[II.21.4-1027]  the fiue wounds paynted, against those who put their onely hope of sal­
[II.21.4-1028]  uation in the wounds of Christ, not those wounds which are painted
[II.21.4-1029]  in a clout by some lewd paynter, but in those wounds which Christ him­
[II.21.4-1030]  selfe bare in his precious body: though they, little knowing what the
[II.21.4-1031]  crosse of Christ meaneth, which neither caruer nor paynter can make,
[II.21.4-1032]  doe beare the image of the crosse painted in a ragge, against those that
[II.21.4-1033]  haue the crosse of Christ painted in their hearts, yea though they paint
[II.21.4-1034]  withall in their flagges, Hoc signo vinces, By this signe thou shalt get the
[II.21.4-1035]  victorie, by a most fonde imitation of the posie of Constantinus Magnus,
[II.21.4-1036]  that noble Christian Emperour, and great conquerour of GODS ene­
[II.21.4-1037]  mies, a most vnmeete ensigne for rebels, the enemies of GOD, their
[II.21.4-1038]  Prince, and countrey, or what other banner soeuer they shall beare: yet
[II.21.4-1039]  let no good and godly subiect, vpon any hope of victorie or good successe,
[II.21.4-1040]  follow such standerd bearers of rebellion.

[II.21.4-1041]  For as examples of such practises are to bee found aswell in the
[II.21.4-1042]  histories of olde, as also of latter rebellions, in our fathers, and our fresh
[II.21.4-1043]  memorie: so notwithstanding these pretences made and banners borne,
[II.21.4-1044]  are recorded withall to perpetuall memorie, the great and horrible mur­
[II.21.4-1045]  ders of infinite multitudes and thousands of the common people slaine in
[II.21.4-1046]  rebellion, dreadfull executions of the authours and captaines, the piti­
[II.21.4-1047]  full vndoing of their wiues & children, and disinheriting of the heyres of
[II.21.4-1048]  the rebels for euer, the spoyling, wasting, and destruction of the people
[II.21.4-1049]  and countrey where rebellion was first begun, that the childe then yet
[II.21.4-1050]  vnborne might rue and lament it, with the finall ouerthrow, and
[II.21.4-1051]  shamefull deaths of all rebels, set foorth aswell in the histories of for­
[II.21.4-1052]  reigne nations, as in the Chronicles of our owne countrey, some thereof
[II.21.4-1053]  being yet in fresh memorie, which if they were collected together, would
[II.21.4-1054]  make many volumes and bookes: But on the contrary part all good
[II.21.4-1055]  lucke, successe and prosperitie that euer happened vnto any rebelles of
[II.21.4-1056]  any age, time or countrey, may bee conteyned in a very few lines,
[II.21.4-1057]  or wordes.

[II.21.4-1058]  Wherefore to conclude, let all good subiects, considering how horri­
[II.21.4-1059]  ble a sinne against GOD, their Prince, their country, and countrimen,
[II.21.4-1060]  against all GODS and mans lawes rebellion is, being indeed not one
[II.21.4-1061]  seuerall sinne, but all sinnes against GOD and man heaped together,
[II.21.4-1062]  considering the mischieuous life and deeds, & the shamefull ends & deaths
[II.21.4-1063]  of all rebels hitherto, and the pitifull vndoing of their wiues, children,
[II.21.4-1064]  and families, and disinheriting of their heires for euer, and aboue all
[II.21.4-1065]  things considering the eternall damnation that is prepared for all impe­
[II.21.4-1066]  nitent rebels in hell with Satan the first founder of rebellion, and grand
[II.21.4-1067]  captaine of all rebels, let all good Subiects I say, considering these
[II.21.4-1068]  things, auoide and flee all rebellion, as the greatest of all mischiefes, and
[II.21.4-1069]  imbrace due obedience to GOD and our Prince, as the greatest of all
[II.21.4-1070]  vertues, that wee may both escape all euils and miseries that doe follow
[II.21.4-1071]  rebellion in this world, and eternall damnation in the world to come, and
[II.21.4-1072]  enioy peace, quietnesse, and securitie, with all other GODS be­
[II.21.4-1073]  nefits and blessings which follow obedience in this life, and final­
[II.21.4-1074]  ly may enioy the kingdome of heauen, the peculiar place of all obedi­
[II.21.4-1075]  ent Subiects to GOD and their Prince in the world to come: which I
[II.21.4-1076]  beseech GOD the King of all kings, graunt vnto vs for the obedience
[II.21.4-1077]  of his Sonne our Sauiour Iesus Christ, vnto whom with the Father
[II.21.4-1078]  and the holy Ghost, one GOD and King immortall, al honour, seruice,
[II.21.4-1079]  and obedience of all his creatures is due for euer and euer, Amen.

[II.21.4-1080]  Thus haue you heard the fourth part of this Homilie,
[II.21.4-1081]  now good people let vs pray.


{P} The Prayer as in that time it
was published.

O Most mighty GOD, the Lord of hostes, the Go­
uernour of al creatures, the only giuer of all victo­
ries, & who alone art able to strengthen the weak
against the mighty, and to vanquish infinite mul­
titudes of thine enemies with the countenance of a few of thy
seruants calling vpon thy Name, & trusting in thee: Defend,
O Lord, thy seruant and our Gouernour vnder thee, our
Queene Elizabeth, & all thy people committed to her charge:
O Lord withstand the cruelty of all those which be common
enemies aswell to the trueth of thy eternall Word, as to their
owne naturall Prince and countrey, and manifestly to this
Crowne & Realme of England which thou hast of thy diuine
prouidence assigned in these our dayes to the gouernement of
thy seruant, our Soueraigne and gracious Queene, O most
mercifull Father, (if it be thy holy will) make soft and tender
the stony hearts of all those that exalt themselues against thy
Trueth and seeke either to trouble the quiet of this Realme
of England, or to oppresse the Crowne of the same, and con­
uert them to the knowledge of thy Sonne the onely Saui­
our of the world, Iesus Christ, that we and they may ioyntly
glorifie thy mercies. Lighten we beseech thee their ignorant
hearts, to imbrace the truth of thy word, or els so abate their
cruelty (O most mighty Lord) that this our Christian Realme
with others that confesse thy holy Gospel, may obtaine by
thine aide and strength, suretie from all enemies, without
shedding of Christian blood, whereby all they which bee op­
pressed with their tyrannie, may be relieued, and they which
bee in feare of their crueltie, may bee comforted: and finally
that all Christian Realmes, and specially this Realme
of England, may by thy defence and protection continue in
the trueth of the Gospel and enioy perfect peace, quietnesse,
and security: and that wee for these thy mercies, iointly alto­
gether with one consonant heart and voyce, may thankfully
render to thee all laud and prayse, that we knit in one god­
ly concord and vnity amongst our selues, may continu­
ally magnifie thy glorious Name, who with thy son
our Sauiour Iesus Christ, and the holy Ghost,
art one Eternall, Almighty, and most
mercifull GOD: To whom be
all laud and prayse world
without end.
Amen.


{P} The fifth part of the Homily against
disobedience and wilfull rebellion.

[II.21.5-1082]  WHereas after both doctrine and examples of due obe­
[II.21.5-1083]  dience of subictes to their Princes, I declared lastly
[II.21.5-1084]  vnto you what an abominable sinne against GOD
[II.21.5-1085]  and man rebellion is, and what horrible plagues,
[II.21.5-1086]  punishments, and deathes, with death euerlasting,
[II.21.5-1087]  finally doeth hang ouer the heades of all rebels: it
[II.21.5-1088]  shall not bee either impertinent, or vnprofitable now
[II.21.5-1089]  to declare who they bee, whom the deuill, the first
[II.21.5-1090]  authour and founder of rebellion, doeth chiefely vse
[II.21.5-1091]  to the stirring vp of subiects to rebell against their lawfull Princes: that
[II.21.5-1092]  knowing them, ye may flee them, and their damnable suggestions, auoid
[II.21.5-1093]  all rebellion, and to escape the horrible plagues, and dreadfull death, and
[II.21.5-1094]  damnation eternall finally due to all rebels.

[II.21.5-1095]  Though many causes of rebellion may bee reckoned, and almost as
[II.21.5-1096]  many as there be vices in men and women, as hath beene before noted:
[II.21.5-1097]  yet in this place I will onely touch the principall and most vsuall causes
[II.21.5-1098]  as specially ambition and ignorance. By ambition, I meane the vnlaw­
[II.21.5-1099]  full and restlesse desire in men, to bee of higher estate then GOD hath
[II.21.5-1100]  giuen or appointed vnto them. By ignorance, I meane no vnskilful­
[II.21.5-1101]  nesse in artes or sciences, but the lacke of knowledge of GODS bles­
[II.21.5-1102]  sed will declared in his holy word, which teacheth both extreamely
[II.21.5-1103]  to abhorre all rebellion, as beeing the roote of all mischiefe, and spe­
[II.21.5-1104]  cially to delight in obedience, as the beginning and foundation of all
[II.21.5-1105]  goodnesse, as hath beene also before specified. And as these are the two
[II.21.5-1106]  chiefe causes of rebellion: so are there specially two sortes of men in
[II.21.5-1107]  whom these vices doe raigne, by whom the deuill, the authour of all
[II.21.5-1108]  euill, doeth chiefly stirre vp all disobedience and rebellion.

[II.21.5-1109]  The restlesse ambitious hauing once determined by one meanes or
[II.21.5-1110]  other to atchieue to their intended purpose, when they cannot by law­
[II.21.5-1111]  full and peaceable meanes clime so high as they doe desire, they at­
[II.21.5-1112]  tempt the same by force and violence: wherein when they cannot pre­
[II.21.5-1113]  uaile against the ordinarie authoritie and power of lawfull Princes and
[II.21.5-1114]  gouernours themselues alone, they doe seeke the ayde and helpe of the
[II.21.5-1115]  ignorant multitude, abusing them to their wicked purpose. Wherefore
[II.21.5-1116]  seeing a few ambitious and malitious are the authours and heads, and
[II.21.5-1117]  multituds of ignorant men are the ministers and furtherers of rebellion,
[II.21.5-1118]  the chiefe point of this part shall bee aswell to notifie to the simple and
[II.21.5-1119]  ignorant men who they bee, that haue beene and be vsuall authours of
[II.21.5-1120]  rebellion, that they may know them: and also to admonish them to be­
[II.21.5-1121]  ware of the subtill suggestions of such restlesse ambitious persons, and so
[II.21.5-1122]  to flee them: that rebellions (though attempted by a few ambitious)
[II.21.5-1123]  through the lacke of maintenance by any multitudes, may speedily and
[II.21.5-1124]  easily without any great labour, danger or domage be repressed and cleare­
[II.21.5-1125]  ly extinguished.

[II.21.5-1126]  It is well knowen aswell by all histories, as by dayly experience, that
[II.21.5-1127]  none haue either more ambitiously aspired aboue Emperours, Kings and
[II.21.5-1128]  Princes: nor haue more pernitiously mooued the ignorant people to re­
[II.21.5-1129]  bellion against their Princes, then certaine persons which falsely cha­
[II.21.5-1130]  lenge to themselues to bee onely counted and called spirituall. I must
[II.21.5-1131]  therefore heere yet once againe briefly put you (good people) in re­
[II.21.5-1132]  membrance out of GODS holy worde, how our Sauiour Iesus
[II.21.5-1133]  Christ, and his holy Apostles, the heads and chiefe of all true Spirituall
[II.21.5-1134]  and Ecclesiasticall men, behaued themselues towards the Princes and
[II.21.5-1135]  Rulers of their time, though not the best gouernours that euer were, that
[II.21.5-1136]  you bee not ignorant whether they be the true disciples and followers of
[II.21.5-1137]  Christ and his Apostles, and so true spirituall men, that either by ambiti­
[II.21.5-1138]  on doe so highly aspire, or doe most maliciously teach, or most pernitiously
[II.21.5-1139]  doe execute rebellion against their lawfull Princes, being the worst of all

[margin]
Matt.17.d.
25.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1140]  carnall workes, and mischieuous deedes.

[II.21.5-1141]  The holy Scriptures doe teach most expresly, that our Sauiour Christ

[margin]
Mark.12.b.
14.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1142]  himselfe, and his Apostles Saint Paul, Saint Peter, with others, were
[II.21.5-1143]  vnto the Magistrates and higher powers, which ruled at their being

[margin]
Luke 20.d.
25.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1144]  vpon the earth, both obedient themselues, and did also diligently and
[II.21.5-1145]  earnestly exhort all other Christians to the like obedience vnto their Prin­

[margin]
Matth.27.
[margin]

[II.21.5-1146]  ces and Gouernours: whereby it is euident that men of the Cleargie,

[margin]
Luke 23.
[margin]

[II.21.5-1147]  and Ecclesiasticall ministers, as their successours ought both themselues

[margin]
Rom.13.a.
1.&c.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1148]  specially, and before other, to bee obedient vnto their Princes, and also

[margin]
1.Tim.2.
a.1.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1149]  to exhort all others vnto the same. Our Sauiour Christ likewise
[II.21.5-1150]  teaching by his doctrine that his Kingdome was not of this world,

[margin]
1.Pet.2.c.
13.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1151]  did by his example in fleeing from those that would haue made him king,
[II.21.5-1152]  confirme the same: expresly also forbidding his Apostles, and by them

[margin]
Ioh.6.b.15.
&18.f.36.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1153]  the whole Cleargie, all princely dominion ouer people and Nations,

[margin]
Matt.20.d.
25.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1154]  and hee and his holy Apostles likewise, namely Peter and Paul, did
[II.21.5-1155]  forbid vnto all Ecclesiasticall ministers, dominion ouer the Church of

[margin]
Mark 10.f.
42.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1156]  Christ. And indeede whiles the Ecclesiasticall ministers continued in
[II.21.5-1157]  Christes Church in that order that is in Christes word prescribed vnto

[margin]
Luke 22.c.
25.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1158]  them, and in Christian kingdoms kept themselues obedient to their owne
[II.21.5-1159]  Princes, as the holy Scripture doeth teach them: both was Christs

[margin]
Mat.23.a.8.
[margin]

[II.21.5-1160]  Church more cleare from ambitious emulations and contentions, and

[margin]
Luk.9.f.46
2.Cor.1.d.
24.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1161]  the state of Christian kingdomes, lesse subiect vnto tumults and rebelli­
[II.21.5-1162]  ons. But after that ambition and desire of dominion entred once into

[margin]
1.Pet.5.a.3.
[margin]

[II.21.5-1163]  Ecclesiasticall ministers, whose greatnesse after the doctrine and exam­

[margin]
Mat.18.a.4
&20.d.28.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1164]  ple of our Sauiour, should chiefly stand in humbling themselues: and

[margin]
Luke 9.f.48
& 22.c.27.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1165]  that the Bishop of Rome being by the order of GODS word none other
[II.21.5-1166]  then the Bishop of that one See and Diocesse, and neuer yet well able to
[II.21.5-1167]  gouerne the same, did by intolerable ambition chalenge, not onely
[II.21.5-1168]  to bee the head of all the Church dispersed throughout the world, but
[II.21.5-1169]  also to bee Lord of all Kingdomes of the world, as is expresly set foorth

[margin]
Sex decre.
lib.3.tit.16.
cap.unic.&
lib.5.tit.9.
cap.5.in
glossa.

[margin]

[II.21.5-1170]  in the booke of his owne Canon lawes, most contrary to the doctrine
[II.21.5-1171]  and example of our Sauiour Christ, whose Vicar, and of his Apostles,
[II.21.5-1172]  namely Peter, whose successour hee pretendeth to bee: after his ambiti­
[II.21.5-1173]  on entred, and this chalenge once made by the Bishop of Rome, hee be­
[II.21.5-1174]  came at once the spoyler and destroyer both of the Church, which is the
[II.21.5-1175]  kingdome of our Sauiour Christ, and of the Christian Empire, and all
[II.21.5-1176]  Christian kingdomes, as an vniuersall tyrant ouer all.

[II.21.5-1177]  And whereas before that chalenge made, there was great amitie and
[II.21.5-1178]  loue amongst the Christians of all countreys, hereupon began emulati­
[II.21.5-1179]  on, and much hatred betweene the Bishop of Rome and his Cleargie
[II.21.5-1180]  and friendes on the one part, and the Grecian Cleargie and Christians
[II.21.5-1181]  of the East on the other part, for that they refused to acknowledg any such
[II.21.5-1182]  supreme authoritie of the Bishop of Rome ouer them: the Bishoppe of
[II.21.5-1183]  Rome for this cause amongst other, not onely naming them, and ta­
[II.21.5-1184]  king them for Schismatikes, but also neuer ceasing to persecute them,
[II.21.5-1185]  and the Emperours who had their See and continuance in Greece, by
[II.21.5-1186]  stirring of the subiectes to rebellion against their soueraigne Lords, and
[II.21.5-1187]  by raysing deadly hatred and most cruell warres betweene them and o­
[II.21.5-1188]  ther Christian Princes. And when the Bishoppes of Rome had trans­
[II.21.5-1189]  lated the title of the Emperour, and as much as in them did lie, the Em­
[II.21.5-1190]  pire it selfe from their Lord the Emperour of Greece, and of Rome also by
[II.21.5-1191]  right vnto the Christian Princes of the West, they became in short space
[II.21.5-1192]  no better vnto the West Emperours, then they were before vnto the
[II.21.5-1193]  Emperours of Greece: for the vsuall discharging of subiectes from their
[II.21.5-1194]  oath of fidelitie made vnto the Emperours of the West their soueraigne
[II.21.5-1195]  Lords, by the Bishoppes of Rome: the vnnaturall stirring vp of the
[II.21.5-1196]  subiectes vnto rebellion against their Princes, yea of the sonne against
[II.21.5-1197]  the father, by the Bishoppe of Rome: the most cruell and bloodie
[II.21.5-1198]  warres raysed amongst Christian Princes of all kingdomes: the hor­
[II.21.5-1199]  rible murder of infinite thousandes of Christian men beeing slaine by
[II.21.5-1200]  Christians: and which ensued thereupon, the pitifull losses, of so ma­
[II.21.5-1201]  nie goodly Cities, Countreys, Dominions, and Kingdomes, some­
[II.21.5-1202]  time possessed by Christians in Asia, Africa, Europa: the miserable fall
[II.21.5-1203]  of the Empire and Church of Greece, sometime the most flourishing
[II.21.5-1204]  parte of Christendome, into the handes of the Turkes: the lamenta­
[II.21.5-1205]  ble diminishing, decaye, and ruine of Christian religion: the dreadfull
[II.21.5-1206]  increase of paganisme, and power of the infidels and miscreants, and all
[II.21.5-1207]  by the practise and procurement of the Bishop of Rome chiefly, is in the
[II.21.5-1208]  histories and chronicles written by the Bishop of Romes own fauourers
[II.21.5-1209]  and friendes to bee seene, and aswell knowen vnto all such as are ac­
[II.21.5-1210]  quainted with the said histories. The ambitious intent and most sub­
[II.21.5-1211]  tile driftes of the Bishops of Rome in these their practises, appeared eui­
[II.21.5-1212]  dently by their bold attempt in spoyling and robbing the Emperours, of
[II.21.5-1213]  their townes, cities, dominions, and kingdomes, in Italie, Lombardie,,
[II.21.5-1214]  and Sicilie, of ancient right belonging vnto the Empire, and by ioyning
[II.21.5-1215]  of them vnto their Bishopricke of Rome, or else giuing them vnto stran­
[II.21.5-1216]  gers, to hold them of the Church and Bishop of Rome as incapite, and
[II.21.5-1217]  as of the chiefe Lordes thereof, in which tenure they hold the most part
[II.21.5-1218]  thereof, euen at this day. But these ambitious and indeede traiterous
[II.21.5-1219]  meanes and spoyling of their soueraigne Lords, the Bishops of Rome,
[II.21.5-1220]  of Priestes, and none other by right then the Bishops of one citie and
[II.21.5-1221]  diocesse, are by false vsurpation become great Lordes of many domini­
[II.21.5-1222]  ons, mightie Princes, yea or Emperours rather, as claiming to haue
[II.21.5-1223]  diuerse Princes and Kings to their vassals, liege men, and subiects: as
[II.21.5-1224]  in the same histories written by their owne familiars and courtiers is to
[II.21.5-1225]  bee seene. And indeede since the time that the Bishops of Rome by am­
[II.21.5-1226]  bition, treason, and vsurpation atchieued and attained to this height and
[II.21.5-1227]  greatnesse, they behaued themselues more like Princes, Kinges, and
[II.21.5-1228]  Emperours in all things, then reamined like Princes, Bishoppes, and
[II.21.5-1229]  ecclesiasticall, or (as they would bee called) spirituall persons, in any
[II.21.5-1230]  one thing at all. For after this rate they haue handled other Kings and
[II.21.5-1231]  Princes of other Realmes throughout Christendome, as well as their
[II.21.5-1232]  Soueraigne Lords the Emperours, vsually discharging their subiects
[II.21.5-1233]  of their oath of fidelity, & so stirring them vp to rebellion against their na­
[II.21.5-1234]  turall Princes, whereof some examples shall in the last part hereof be no­
[II.21.5-1235]  tified vnto you.

[II.21.5-1236]  Wherefore let all good subiectes, knowing these the speciall instru­
[II.21.5-1237]  ments, and ministers of the deuill, to the stirring vp of all rebellions,
[II.21.5-1238]  auoyde and flee them, and the pestilent suggestions of such forraigne v­
[II.21.5-1239]  surpers, and their adherentes, and embrace all obedience to GOD, and
[II.21.5-1240]  their naturall Princes and Soueraignes, that they may enioy GODS
[II.21.5-1241]  blessings, and their Princes fauour, all peace, quietnesse, securitie in
[II.21.5-1242]  this world, and finally attaine through Christ our Sauiour, life euer­
[II.21.5-1243]  lasting in the world to come: which GOD the Father for the same
[II.21.5-1244]  our Sauiour Iesus Christ his sake grant vnto vs all, to whom with
[II.21.5-1245]  the holy Ghost, be all honour and glory, world without end, Amen.

[II.21.5-1246]  Thus haue you heard the fifth part of this Homilie, now
[II.21.5-1247]  good people let vs pray.


[II.21.5-1279]  and security: and that wee for these thy mercies, ioyntly alto­
[II.21.5-1280]  gether with one consonant heart and voyce, may thankfully
[II.21.5-1281]  render to thee all laud and prayse, that we knit in one god­
[II.21.5-1282]  ly concord and vnity amongst our selues, may continu­
[II.21.5-1283]  ally magnifie thy glorious Name, who with thy son
[II.21.5-1284]  our Sauiour Iesus Christ, and the holy Ghost,
[II.21.5-1285]  art one Eternall, Almighty, and most
[II.21.5-1286]  mercifull GOD: To whom be
[II.21.5-1287]  all laud and prayse world
[II.21.5-1288]  without end.
[II.21.5-1289]  Amen.

{P} The sixth and last part of the Homily against
disobedience and wilfull rebellion.

[II.21.6-1290]  NOW whereas the iniuries, oppressions, rauenie, and
[II.21.6-1291]  tyranny of the Bishop of Rome, vsurping aswell against
[II.21.6-1292]  their naturall Lords the Emperours, as against all other
[II.21.6-1293]  Christian Kings, and Kingdomes, and their continuall
[II.21.6-1294]  stirring of subiects vnto rebellions against their Soue­
[II.21.6-1295]  raigne Lords, whereof I haue partly admonished you
[II.21.6-1296]  before, were intolerable: and it may seeme more then
[II.21.6-1297]  maruayle, that any subiects would after such sort hold with vnnaturall
[II.21.6-1298]  forraine vsurpers against their owne soueraigne Lords, and naturall
[II.21.6-1299]  countrey: It remayneth that I doe declare the meane whereby they
[II.21.6-1300]  compassed these matters, and so to conclude this whole treaty of due obe­
[II.21.6-1301]  dience, and against disobedience, and wilfull rebellion. You shall vnder­

[margin]
Of ignorance
of the simple
people the
latter part.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1302]  stand, that by ignorance of GODS word, wherein they kept all men,
[II.21.6-1303]  specially the common people, they wrought and brought to passe all these
[II.21.6-1304]  things, making them beleeue that all that they sayd was true, all that
[II.21.6-1305]  they did was good and godly: and that to hold with them in all things,
[II.21.6-1306]  against father, mother, prince, countrey, and all men, was most merito­
[II.21.6-1307]  rious. And indeed what mischiefe will not blinde ignorance leade simple
[II.21.6-1308]  men vnto?

[II.21.6-1309]  By ignorance the Iewish Clergie induced the common people to aske
[II.21.6-1310]  the deliuery of Barabbas the seditious murderer, and to sue for the cruell
[II.21.6-1311]  crucifying of our Sauiour Christ, for that he rebuked the ambition, su­
[II.21.6-1312]  perstition, and other vices of the high Priests and Clergie. For as our
[II.21.6-1313]  Sauiour Christ testifieth, that those who crucified him wist not what
[II.21.6-1314]  they did: so doeth the holy Apostle Saint Paul say, If they had knowen, if
[II.21.6-1315]  they had not beene ignorant, they would neuer haue crucified the Lord
[II.21.6-1316]  of glory: but they knew not what they did. Our Sauiour Christ him­
[II.21.6-1317]  selfe also foreshewed that it should come to passe by ignorance, that those
[II.21.6-1318]  who should persecute and murder his true Apostles and Disciples, should
[II.21.6-1319]  thinke they did GOD acceptable sacrifice, and good seruice: as it is also
[II.21.6-1320]  verified euen at this day.

[II.21.6-1321]  And in this ignorance haue the Bishops of Rome kept the people of
[II.21.6-1322]  GOD, specially the common sort, by no meanes so much, as by with­
[II.21.6-1323]  drawing of the word of GOD from them, and by keeping it vnder the
[II.21.6-1324]  vayle of an vnknowen strange tongue. For as it serued the ambitious
[II.21.6-1325]  humour of the Bishops of Rome, to compell all nations to vse the natu­
[II.21.6-1326]  rall language of the city of Rome, where they were Bishops, which shew­
[II.21.6-1327]  ed a certain acknowledging of subiection vnto them: so yet serued it much
[II.21.6-1328]  more their craftie purpose, thereby to keepe all people so blind, that
[II.21.6-1329]  they not knowing what they prayed, what they beleeued, what they
[II.21.6-1330]  were commanded by GOD, might take all their commandements for
[II.21.6-1331]  GODS. For as they would not suffer the holy Scriptures or Church
[II.21.6-1332]  seruice to bee vsed or had in any other language then the Latine: so were
[II.21.6-1333]  very fewe, euen of the most simple people taught the Lords prayer, the
[II.21.6-1334]  articles of the faith, and the tenne commandements, otherwise then in
[II.21.6-1335]  Latine, which they vnderstood not: by which vniuersall ignorance, all
[II.21.6-1336]  men were ready to beleeue whatsoeuer they sayde, and to doe whatso­
[II.21.6-1337]  euer they commanded.

[margin]
Sicogno­
uissent.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1338]  For to imitate the Apostles phrase: If the Emperours subiectes had
[II.21.6-1339]  knowne out of GODS word their dutie to their prince, they would
[II.21.6-1340]  not haue suffered the Bishop of Rome to perswade them to forsake their
[II.21.6-1341]  Soueraigne lord the Emperour against their oath of fidelitie, and to rebel
[II.21.6-1342]  against him, onely for that he cast images (vnto the which idolatrie was

[margin]
Gregorius
2.and 3.
Anno Do.
726 &c.
In the se­
cond com­
mande­
ment.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1343]  committed) out of the churches, which the Bishoppe of Rome bare
[II.21.6-1344]  them in hand to bee heresie. If they had knowen of GODS worde
[II.21.6-1345]  but as much as the tenne commaundements, they should haue founde
[II.21.6-1346]  that the Bishop of Rome, was not onely a traytour to the Emperour his
[II.21.6-1347]  liege Lord, but to GOD also, and an horrible blasphemer of his maiesty,
[II.21.6-1348]  in calling his holy word and commaundement heresie: and that which
[II.21.6-1349]  the Byshoppe of Rome tooke for a iust cause to rebell against his lawfull
[II.21.6-1350]  prince, they might haue knowen to bee a doublinge and triplinge of his
[II.21.6-1351]  most heynous wickednesse, heaped with horrible impiety and blasphemy.

[II.21.6-1352]  But lest the poore people should know too much, he would not let them
[II.21.6-1353]  haue as much of GODS word, as the tenne commaundements wholy
[II.21.6-1354]  and perfectly, withdrawinge from them the second commaundement,
[II.21.6-1355]  that bewrayeth his impietie, by a subtill sacrilege. Had the Emperours
[II.21.6-1356]  subiects likewise knowen, and beene of any vnderstanding in GODS

[margin]
Henrie 4.
Gregor.7.
Anno Do­
mini 176.
Paschal.2.
Anno 199.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1357]  word, would they at other times haue rebelled against their Soueraigne
[II.21.6-1358]  Lord, and by their rebellion haue holpen to depose him, onely for that the
[II.21.6-1359]  Byshop of Rome did beare them in hand, that it was symonie and heresie
[II.21.6-1360]  to, for the Emperour to giue any ecclesiasticall dignities, or promotions
[II.21.6-1361]  to his learned Chaplaines, or other of his learned Clergie, which al Chri­
[II.21.6-1362]  stian Emperours before him had done without controulement? woulde
[II.21.6-1363]  they, I say, for that the Bishop of Rome bare them so in hand, haue rebel­
[II.21.6-1364]  led by the space of more then fourtie yeeres together against him, with so
[II.21.6-1365]  much shedding of Christian bloud, and murther of so many thousandes of
[II.21.6-1366]  Christians, and finally haue deposed their Soueraigne Lorde, had they
[II.21.6-1367]  knowen and had in GODS word any vnderstanding at all? Specially
[II.21.6-1368]  had they knowen that they did all this to plucke from their Soueraigne
[II.21.6-1369]  Lord, and his successours for euer, their auncient right of the Empire, to
[II.21.6-1370]  giue it vnto the Romish Clergie, and to the Bishop of Rome, that hee
[II.21.6-1371]  might for the confirmation of one Archbishop, and for the Romish ragge,
[II.21.6-1372]  which he calleth a Paul, scarce worth twelue pence, receiue many thou­
[II.21.6-1373]  sand crownes of gold, and of other Bishops, likewise great summes of
[II.21.6-1374]  money for their bulles, which is symonie indede: Would, I say, Chri­
[II.21.6-1375]  stian men and subiectes by rebellion haue spent so much Christian blood,
[II.21.6-1376]  and haue desposed their naturall, most noble, and most valiant Prince,
[II.21.6-1377]  to bring the matter finally to this passe, had they knowen what they did,
[II.21.6-1378]  or had any vnderstanding in GODS word at all? And as these am­
[II.21.6-1379]  bitious vsurpers the Bishops of Rome haue ouerflowed all Italie and
[II.21.6-1380]  Germanie with streames of Christian blood, shed by the rebellions of ig­
[II.21.6-1381]  norant subiects against their naturall Lords and Emperours, whom
[II.21.6-1382]  they haue stirred thereunto by such false pretences: so is there no coun­
[II.21.6-1383]  trey in Christendome, which by their like meanes and false pretences,
[II.21.6-1384]  hath not beene ouersprinkled with the blood of subiectes by rebellion a­
[II.21.6-1385]  gainst their naturall Soueraigns stirred vp by &the; same Bishops of Rome.

[II.21.6-1386]  And to vse one example of our owne countrey: The Bishoppe of Rome
[II.21.6-1387]  did picke a quarrell to King Iohn of England, about the election of Ste­
[II.21.6-1388]  uen Langton
to the Bishopricke of Canterburie, wherein the King had an­
[II.21.6-1389]  cient right, being vsed by his progenitors, all Christian Kinges of Eng­
[II.21.6-1390]  land
before him, the Bishops of Rome hauing no right, but had begunne

[margin]
King Iohn.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1391]  then to vsurpe vpon the Kinges of Englande, and all other Christian
[II.21.6-1392]  Kinges, as they had before done against their Soueraigne Lordes the
[II.21.6-1393]  Emperours: proceeding euen by the same waies & meanes, & likewise cur­
[II.21.6-1394]  sing King Iohn, and discharginge his subiects of their oath of fidelitie vn­
[II.21.6-1395]  to their Soueraigne Lord. Now had Englishmen at that time knowen
[II.21.6-1396]  their duetie to their prince set forth in GODS worde, would a great
[II.21.6-1397]  many of nobles, and other Englishmen naturall subiectes, for this for­
[II.21.6-1398]  raigne and vnnaturall vsurper his vayne curse of the King, and for his

[margin]
Innocen­
cini.3.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1399]  faigned discharginge of them of their oath and fidelitie to their naturall
[II.21.6-1400]  Lord, vpon so slender or no grounde at all, haue rebelled against their so­
[II.21.6-1401]  ueraigne Lorde the Kinge? Would Englishe subiects haue taken part a­
[II.21.6-1402]  gainst the King of England, and against Englishemen, with the French
[II.21.6-1403]  King and Frenchmen, beeing incensed against this Realme by the Bi­
[II.21.6-1404]  shoppe of Rome? Would they haue sent for, and receiued the Dolphine of
[II.21.6-1405]  Fraunce with a great armie of Frenchmen into the Realme of England?

[margin]
Philip
French
King.
Lewes
Dolphine
of France.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1406]  Would they haue sworne fidelitie to the Dolphine of Fraunce, breaking
[II.21.6-1407]  their oath of fidelitie to their naturall Lord the Kinge of England, and
[II.21.6-1408]  haue stood vnder the Dolphins banner displayed against the King of En­
[II.21.6-1409]  gland
? Would they haue expelled their soueraigne Lorde the Kinge of
[II.21.6-1410]  England out of London, the chiefe cittie of England, and out of the great­
[II.21.6-1411]  est part of England, vpon the Southside of Trent, euen vnto Lincolne,
[II.21.6-1412]  and out of Lincolne it selfe also, and haue deliuered the possession thereof
[II.21.6-1413]  vnto the Dolphin of Fraunce, wherof he kept &the; possession a great while?
[II.21.6-1414]  Would they beeing Englishmen haue procured so great shedding of Eng­
[II.21.6-1415]  lish bloud, and other infinite mischiefes and miseries vnto England their
[II.21.6-1416]  natural countrie, as did follow those cruell warres and trayterous rebel­
[II.21.6-1417]  lion, the fruits of the Bishop of Romes blessings? Would they haue driuen
[II.21.6-1418]  their naturall soueraigne Lord the King of England to such extremitie,
[II.21.6-1419]  that he was inforced to submit himselfe vnto that forraigne false vsurper
[II.21.6-1420]  the Bishop of Rome, who compelled him to surrender vp the crowne of
[II.21.6-1421]  England into the handes of his Legate, who in token of possession kept it
[II.21.6-1422]  in his handes diuers dayes, and then deliuered it againe to King Iohn,
[II.21.6-1423]  vpon that condition that the King and his Successours, Kings of Eng­
[II.21.6-1424]  land
, should hold the Crowne, and Kingdome of England of the Bishop
[II.21.6-1425]  of Rome and his successours, as the vassals of the sayd Bishops of Rome
[II.21.6-1426]  for euer: in token whereof, the Kings of England should also pay a yeere­
[II.21.6-1427]  ly tribute to the sayd Bishoppe of Rome as his vassals and liege men?
[II.21.6-1428]  Would Englishmen haue brought their Soueraigne lord, and naturall
[II.21.6-1429]  countrey into this thraldome and subiection to a false forraigne vsurper,
[II.21.6-1430]  had they knowen and had any vnderstanding in GODS word at all?
[II.21.6-1431]  Out of the which most lamentable case, and miserable tyrannie, rauenie,
[II.21.6-1432]  and spoyle of the most greedie Romish wolues ensuing hereupon, the
[II.21.6-1433]  Kings and Realme of England could not rid themselues by the space of

[margin]
See the Acts
of Parlia­
ment in king
Edward the
third his
dayes.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1434]  many yeeres after: the Bishop of Rome by his ministers continually not
[II.21.6-1435]  onely spoyling the Realme and Kings of England of infinite treasure,
[II.21.6-1436]  but also with the same money hiring and maintaining forreigne ene­
[II.21.6-1437]  mies against the Realme and Kings of England, to keepe them in such
[II.21.6-1438]  his subiection, that they should not refuse to pay whatsoeuer those vnsa­
[II.21.6-1439]  tiable wolues did greedily gape for, and suffer whatsoeuer those most cru­
[II.21.6-1440]  ell tyrants would lay vpon them. Would Englishmen haue suffered this?
[II.21.6-1441]  would they by rebellion haue caused this trow you, and all for the Bi­
[II.21.6-1442]  shop of Romes causelesse curse, had they in those dayes knowen and vn­
[II.21.6-1443]  derstood, that GOD doeth curse the blessings, and blesse the cursings
[II.21.6-1444]  of such wicked vsurping Bishops and tyrants? as it appeared after­
[II.21.6-1445]  ward in King Henry the eight his dayes, and King Edward the sixt, and
[II.21.6-1446]  in our gracious Soueraignes dayes that now is, where neither the

[margin]
Malach.2.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1447]  Popes curses, nor GODS manifold blessings are wanting. But in
[II.21.6-1448]  King Iohns time, the Bishop of Rome vnderstanding the bruit blindnesse,
[II.21.6-1449]  ignorance of GODS word, and superstition of Englishmen, and how
[II.21.6-1450]  much they were enclined to worship the Babylonicall beast of Rome,
[II.21.6-1451]  and to feare all his threatnings, and causelesse curses, hee abused them
[II.21.6-1452]  thus, and by their rebellion brought this noble Realme, and Kings of
[II.21.6-1453]  England vnder his most cruell tyrannie, and to bee a spoyle of his most
[II.21.6-1454]  vile and vnsatiable couetousnesse and rauenie, for a long and a great
[II.21.6-1455]  deale too long a time. And to ioyne vnto the reportes of Histories, mat­
[II.21.6-1456]  ters of later memorie, could the Bishop of Rome haue raised the late re­
[II.21.6-1457]  bellions in the North and West countreys in the times of King Henry,
[II.21.6-1458]  and King Edward, our gracious Soueraignes father and brother, but
[II.21.6-1459]  by abusing of the ignorant people? Or is it not most euident that the
[II.21.6-1460]  Bishop of Rome hath of late attempted by his Irish Patriarkes and Bi­
[II.21.6-1461]  shops, sent from Rome with his Bulles, (whereof some were apprehen­
[II.21.6-1462]  ded) to breake downe the barres and hedges of the publique peace in
[II.21.6-1463]  Ireland, onely vpon confidence easily to abuse the ignorance of the wilde
[II.21.6-1464]  Irish men? Or who seeth not that vpon like confidence, yet more lately
[II.21.6-1465]  hee hath likewise procured the breach of the publique peace in England,
[II.21.6-1466]  (with the long and blessed continuance whereof hee is sore grieued) by
[II.21.6-1467]  the ministery of his disguised Chaplaynes, creeping in Lay mens ap­
[II.21.6-1468]  parell into the houses, and whispering in the eares of certaine Northern
[II.21.6-1469]  borderers, being then most ignorant of their duetie to GOD and to
[II.21.6-1470]  their Prince of all people of the Realme, whom therefore as most meete
[II.21.6-1471]  and ready to execute his intended purpose, hee hath by the said ignorant
[II.21.6-1472]  Masse priests, as blinde guides leading the blinde, brought those seely
[II.21.6-1473]  blinde subiects into the deepe ditch of horrible rebellion, damnable to
[II.21.6-1474]  themselues, and very dangerous to the state of the Realme, had not
[II.21.6-1475]  GOD of his mercy miraculously calmed that raging tempest, not onely
[II.21.6-1476]  without any ship wracke of the Common wealth, but almost without
[II.21.6-1477]  any shedding of Christian and English blood at all.

[II.21.6-1478]  And it is yet much more to be lamented, that not onely common people,
[II.21.6-1479]  but some other youthfull or vnskilfull Princes also, suffer themselues to
[II.21.6-1480]  bee abused by the Bishop of Rome, his Cardinals and Bishops, to op­
[II.21.6-1481]  pressing of Christian men their faithfull subiects, eyther themselues, or
[II.21.6-1482]  els by procuring the force and strength of Christian men, to bee conueyed
[II.21.6-1483]  out of one countrey, to oppresse true Christians in another countrey, and
[II.21.6-1484]  by these meanes open an entry vnto Moores and Infidels, into the pos­
[II.21.6-1485]  session of Christian Realmes countries: other Christian Princes in the
[II.21.6-1486]  meane time, by the Bishop of Romes procuring also, being so occupied in
[II.21.6-1487]  ciuill warres, or troubled with rebellions, that they haue neither leisure
[II.21.6-1488]  nor abilitie to conferre their common forces, to the defence of their fellow
[II.21.6-1489]  Christians, against such inuasions of the common enemies of Christen­
[II.21.6-1490]  dome, the Infidels and miscreants. Would to GOD we might onely
[II.21.6-1491]  reade and heare out of the histories of olde, and not also see and feele
[II.21.6-1492]  these new and present oppressions of Christians, rebellions of subiects,
[II.21.6-1493]  effusion of Christian blood, destruction of Christian men, decay and ruine
[II.21.6-1494]  of Christendome, increase of Paganisme, most lamentable and pitifull to
[II.21.6-1495]  behold, being procured in these our dayes, aswell as in times past, by the
[II.21.6-1496]  Bishop of Rome and his ministers, abusing the ignorance of GODS
[II.21.6-1497]  word, yet remayning in some Christian Princes and people. By which
[II.21.6-1498]  sorrow and bitter fruites of ignorance, all men ought to bee mooued to
[II.21.6-1499]  giue eare and credite to GODS worde, shewing as most truely, so
[II.21.6-1500]  most plainely how great a mischiefe ignorance is, and againe how great
[II.21.6-1501]  and how good a gift of GOD knowledge in GODS word is. And

[margin]
Ier.18.e.18
[margin]

[II.21.6-1502]  to beginne with the Romish Cleargie, who though they doe bragge
[II.21.6-1503]  now, as did sometime the Iewish Cleargie, that they cannot lacke know­
[II.21.6-1504]  ledge: yet doeth GOD by his holy Prophets both charge them with

[margin]
Eze.7.g.26
[margin]

[II.21.6-1505]  ignorance, and threaten them also, for that they haue repelled the know­

[margin]
Osee.4.b.6.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1506]  ledge of GODS word and Law, from themselues, and from his peo­

[margin]
Psalm.2.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1507]  ple, that hee will repell them, that they shall bee no more his Priests.
[II.21.6-1508]  GOD likewise chargeth Princes aswell as Priests, that they should
[II.21.6-1509]  indeuour themselues to get vnderstanding and knowledge in his word,
[II.21.6-1510]  threatning his heauie wrath and destruction vnto them, if they faile
[II.21.6-1511]  thereof. And the wise man saith to all men vniuersally, Princes, priests,
[II.21.6-1512]  and people: Where is no knowledge, there is no good nor health to the

[margin]
Prou.19.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1513]  soule: and that all men be vaine in whom is not the knowledge of GOD,
[II.21.6-1514]  and his holy word: That they who walke in darknesse, wote not whi­

[margin]
Wisd.13.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1515]  ther they goe: and that the people that will not learne, shall fall into

[margin]
Prou.17.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1516]  great mischiefes, as did the people of Israel, who for their ignorance in

[margin]
Ephes.4.
Iohn 12.
[margin]
[margin]
Esai.5.13.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1517]  GODS word, were first led into captiuitie, and when by ignorance af­

[margin]
Luk.19.g.
44.&23.c.
34.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1518]  terward they would not know the time of their visitation, but crucified
[II.21.6-1519]  Christ our Sauiour, persecuted his holy Apostles, and were so ignorant
[II.21.6-1520]  and blinde, that when they did most wickedly and cruelly, they thought

[margin]
Acts mul­
tis locis.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1521]  they did GOD good and acceptable seruice (as doe many by ignorance

[margin]
Ioh.16.a.2.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1522]  thinke euen at this day:) finally, through their ignorance and blinde­
[II.21.6-1523]  nesse, their countrey, townes, cities, Hierusalem it selfe, and the Temple
[II.21.6-1524]  of GOD, were all most horribly destroyed, the most chiefest part of their

[margin]
Esai.27.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1525]  people slaine, and the rest ledde into most miserable captiuitie. For hee

[margin]
Osee.4.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1526]  that made them, had no pitie vpon them, neither would spare them, and

[margin]
Baruc.3.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1527]  all for their ignorance.

[margin]
Esai.6.c.9.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1528]  And the holy Scriptures doe teach, that the people that will not

[margin]
Matt.13.b.
14.15.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1529]  see with their eyes, nor heare with their eares, to learne, and to vnder­
[II.21.6-1530]  stand with their heartes, cannot bee conuerted, and saued. And the

[margin]
Iohn 12.40
[margin]

[II.21.6-1531]  wicked themselues, beeing damned in hell, shall confesse ignorance in

[margin]
Wisd 5.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1532]  GODS worde to haue brought them thereunto, saying, Wee haue
[II.21.6-1533]  erred from the way of the trueth, and the light of righteousnesse hath

[margin]
Mat.13.19.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1534]  not shined vnto vs, and the sunne of vnderstanding hath not risen vn­

[margin]
2.Cor.4.a.
3.4.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1535]  to vs, wee haue wearied our selues in the way of wickednesse and per­
[II.21.6-1536]  dition, and haue walked cumberous and crooked wayes: but the way

[margin]
Matth.7.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1537]  of the Lord haue we not knowen.

[margin]
Iohn 3.
Mat.11.b.
15.& 13.a.
9.f.43.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1538]  And aswell our Sauiour himselfe, as his Apostle Saint Paul doth
[II.21.6-1539]  teach, that the ignorance of GODS worde commeth of the deuill,
[II.21.6-1540]  is the cause of all errour, and misiudging (as falleth out with ignorant

[margin]
Luk.8.a.8.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1541]  subiects, who can rather espie a little mote in the eye of the Prince, or

[margin]
Ioh 5.f.39.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1542]  a Counsellour, then a great beame in their owne) and vniuersally it

[margin]
Psal.1.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1543]  is the cause of all euill, and finally of eternall damnation, GODS

[margin]
Matt.7.b.7.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1544]  iudgement being seuere towards those, who when the light of Christes

[margin]
Luk.11 9.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1545]  Gospel is come into the world, doe delight more in darkenesse of igno­

[margin]
Luk.16.g.
30.31.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1546]  rance, then in the light of knowledge in GODS worde. For all

[margin]
Gal.1.b.8.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1547]  are commanded to reade or heare, to search and studie the holy Scrip­

[margin]
Deut.5.32.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1548]  tures, and are promised vnderstanding to bee giuen them from GOD,

[margin]
Deut.17.c.
14.15.&c.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1549]  if they so doe: all are charged not to beleeue eyther any dead man, nor
[II.21.6-1550]  if an Angel should speake from heauen, much lesse if the Pope doe speake

[margin]
Rom.13.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1551]  from Rome against or contrary to the word of GOD, from the which

[margin]
1.Pet.2.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1552]  we may not decline, neither to the right hand nor to the left.

[margin]
Psal.118.
Psalm.18.
& 118.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1553]  In GODS worde Princes must learne how to obey GOD, and
[II.21.6-1554]  to gouerne men: in GODS worde subiects must learne obedience,

[margin]
Ephes.5.14
[margin]

[II.21.6-1555]  both to GOD and their Princes. Olde men and young, rich and

[margin]
1.Thes.5.a.
4.5.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1556]  poore, all men and women, all estates, sexes and ages, are taught their
[II.21.6-1557]  seuerall dueties in the worde of GOD. For the word of GOD is

[margin]
Iohn 12.
35.36.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1558]  bright, giuing light vnto all mens eyes, the shining lampe directing
[II.21.6-1559]  all mens pathes, and steppes. Let vs therefore awake from the sleepe

[margin]
Iam.1.c.17.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1560]  and darkenesse of ignorance, and open our eyes that wee may see the

[margin]
1.Tim.6.
d.16.

[margin]

[II.21.6-1561]  light, let vs rise from the workes of darkenesse, that we may escape eter­

[margin]
Iohn 3.
[margin]

[II.21.6-1562]  nall darkenesse, the due reward thereof, and let vs walke in the light
[II.21.6-1563]  of GODS word, whiles we haue light, as becommeth the children
[II.21.6-1564]  of light, so directing the steppes of our liues in that way which leadeth
[II.21.6-1565]  to light and life euerlasting, that wee may finally obtayne and enioy the
[II.21.6-1566]  same: which GOD the father of lights, who dwelleth in light incom­
[II.21.6-1567]  prehensible, and inaccessable, grant vnto vs, through the light of the
[II.21.6-1568]  world our Sauiour Iesus Christ, vnto whom with the holy Ghost, one
[II.21.6-1569]  most glorious GOD, be all honour, prayse, and thankesgiuing for euer
[II.21.6-1570]  and euer. Amen.

[II.21.6-1571]  Thus haue you heard the sixth part of this Homily,
[II.21.6-1572]  now good people let vs pray.




{P} The Prayer as in that time it
was published.

O Most mighty GOD, the Lord of hostes, the Gouer­
nour of all creatures, the only giuer of all victories,
who alone art able to strengthen the Weake against
the mighty, and to vanquish infinite multitudes of
thine enemies with the countenance of a few of thy seruants
calling vpon thy Name, and trusting in thee: Defend O
Lord, thy seruant & our Gouernour vnder thee, our Queene
Elizabeth and all thy people committed to her charge, O Lord
withstand the crueltie of all those which be common enemies
as well to the trueth of thy eternall Word, as to their owne
naturall Prince and countrey, and manifestly to this Crowne
and Realme of England, which thou hast of thy diuine pro­
uidence assigned in these our dayes to the gouernment of thy
seruant, our Soueraigne & gracious Queene. O most mer­
cifull Father, (if it be thy holy will) make soft and tender the
stonie hearts of all those that exalt themselues against thy
Trueth, and seeke either to trouble the quiet of this Realme
of England, or to oppresse the Crowne of the same, and con­
uert them to the knowledge of thy Sonne the onely Saui­
our of the world, Iesus Christ that we and they may ioyntly
glorifie thy mercies. Lighten we beseech thee their ignorant
hearts, to imbrace the truth of thy Word, or els so abate their
cruelty (O most mighty Lord) that this our Christian Realm,
with others that confesse thy holy Gospel, may obtaine by
thine ayde and strength, surety from all enemies, without
shedding of Christian blood, whereby all they which bee op­
pressed with their tyranny, may bee relieued, and they which
bee in feare of their cruelty, may bee comforted: and finally
that all Christian Realmes, and specially this Realme of
England, may by thy defence and protection continue in
the trueth of the Gospel, and enioy perfect peace, quietnesse,
and securitie: and that we for these thy mercies, ioyntly alto­
gether with one consonant heart and voice, may thankefully
render to thee all laud and praise, that we knit in one god­
ly concord and vnitie amongst our selues, may continu­
ally magnifie thy glorious Name, who with thy son
our Sauiour Iesus Christ, and the holy Ghost,
art one Eternall, Almightie, and most
mercifull GOD: To whom be
all laud, and praise world
without end,
Amen.


A THANKESGIVING
for the suppression of the last rebellion.

O Heauenly and most mercifull Father, the
defender of those that put their trust in
thee, the sure fortresse of all them that flie
to thee for succour: who of thy most iust
iudgements for our disobedience and re­
bellion against thy holy word, and for
our sinfull and wicked liuing, nothing answering to our
holy profession, wherby we haue giuen an occasion that
thy holy name hath beene blasphemed amongst the ig­
norant, hast of late both sore abashed the whole Realm,
and people of England, with the terrour and danger of
rebellion, thereby to awake vs out of our dead sleepe of
carelesse security: and hast yet by the miseries following
the same rebellion more sharpely punished part of our
countreymen and Christian brethren, who haue more
neerely felt the same: and most dreadfully hast scourged
some of the seditious persons with terrible executions,
iustly inflicted for their disobedience to thee, and to thy
seruant their Soueraigne, to the example of vs all, and to
the warning, correction and amendment of thy seruants,
of thine accustomed goodnesse, turning alwaies the wic­
kednesse of euill men to the profit of them that feare thee:
who in thy iudgements remembring thy mercy, hast by
thy assistance giuen the victory to thy seruant our
Queene, her true Nobility, and faithfull Subiects, with
so little, or rather no effusion of Christian blood, as also
might haue iustly ensued, to the exceeding comfort of all
sorrowfull Christian hearts, and that of thy fatherly pity,
and mercifull goodnesse onely, and euen for thine owne
names sake, without any our desert at all. Wherefore we
render vnto thee most humble and hearty thankes for
these thy great mercies shewed vnto vs, who had deser­
ued sharper punishment, most humbly beseeching thee
to grant vnto all vs that confesse thy holy Name, and
professe the true and perfect Religion of thy holy Gos­
pel, thy heauenly grace to shew our selues in our liuing
according to our profession: that wee truely knowing
thee in they blessed word, may obediently walke in thy
holy commandements, and that wee being warned by
this thy fatherly correction, doe prouoke thy iust wrath
against vs no more: but may enioy the continuance of
thy great mercies towards vs, thy right hand, as in this,
so in all other inuasions, rebellions, and dangers, conti­
nually sauing and defending our Church, our Realme,
our Queene, and people of England, that all our poste­
rities ensuing, confessing thy holy Name, professing thy
holy Gospel, and leading an holy life, may perpe­
tually prayse and magnifie thee, with thy only
Son Iesus Christ our Sauiour and the
holy Ghost, to whom bee all
laud, prayse, glory, and
Empire for euer,
and euer, A­
men.

LONDON
{P} Printed by Iohn Bill, Printer to the Kings most
Excellent Maiestie. 1623.