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Thomas Hardy
(1840-1928)


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Works | Bio-Bibliographical Note | Acknowledgements | Usage

Thomas Hardy's Works

  • Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Jude the Obscure
  • Mayor of Casterbridge
  • Return of the Native
  • Tess of the D'Urbervilles
  • The Woodlanders

  • A Bio-bibliographical note about Thomas Hardy

    "THOMAS HARDY was born in a cottage in Higher Bockhampton, near Dorchester, on 2 June 1840. He was educated locally and at sixteen was articled to a Dorchester architect, John Hicks. In 1862 he moved to London and found employment with another architect, Arthur Blomfield. He now began to write poetry and published an essay. By 1867 he had returned to Dorset to work as Hicks's assistant and began his first (unpublished) novel, The Poor Man and the Lady.

    "On an architectural visit to St Juliot in Cornwall in 1870 he met his first wife, Emma Gifford. Before their marriage in 1874 he had published four novels and was earning his living as a writer. More novels followed and in 1878 the Hardys moved from Dorset to the London literary scene. But in 1885, after building his house at Max Gate near Dorchester, Hardy again returned to Dorset. He then produced most of his major novels: The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), The Woodlanders (1887), Tess of the D'Urbervilles (1891), The Pursuit of the Well-Beloved (1892) and Jude the Obscure (1895). Amidst the controversy caused by Jude the Obscure, he turned to the poetry he had been writing all his life. In the next thirty years he published over nine hundred poems and his epic drama in verse, The Dynasts.

    "After a long and bitter estrangement, Emma Gifford died at Max Gate in 1912. Paradoxically, the event triggered some of Hardy's finest love poetry. In 1914, however, he married Florence Dugdale, a close friend for several years. In 1910 he had been awarded the Order of Merit and was recognized, even revered, as the major literary figure of the time. He died on 11 January 1928. His ashes were buried in Westminster Abbey and his heart at Stinsford in Dorset."

    Source: Penguin Web Site (http://www.futurenet.co.uk/Penguin/Authors/1713.html). Accessed 6 December 1996.


    Credits and Acknowledgements

    This is a project of the Department of English and the Faculty of Arts and Science, funded by the Provost's Electronic Courseware Fund. The University of Toronto English Library was created by Ian Lancashire, Christopher Douglas, and Dennis G. Jerz. We wish to thank the University of Toronto Information Commons, and the members of the Centre for Academic Technology, especially John Bradley, Ian Graham, and Allen Forsyth. See individual Works pages for other credits.

    Photograph by Elliot & Fry. (Source: Thomas Hardy. Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Ed. Sarah E. Maier. Peterborough: Broadview Literary Texts, 1996. Page 3. PR 4748 A2M35 1996 ROBA.)


    Usage

    Permission is hereby given to copy the HTML version of poems, plays and novels in the University of Toronto English Library for non-commercial educational uses; that is, for teaching, research, and study, as long as copyright information is not removed from any University of Toronto English Library On-line file and as long as no charge is made for use of the collection.